Teen sexting: pleasure is missing from the discussion

Sexting has increased among teens in recent years, and increases as youths age, according to new research published in JAMA Pediatrics.

An estimated one in seven teens sends sexts and one in four receives them, according to the research.

The paper reviews 39 studies conducted between 1990 to 2016 involving more than 110,000 participants. Two studies took place in Australia, and others in countries including the United States, Korea and South Africa.

Grindr, virtual reality and vlogging: new ways to talk about sexual health

The Guardian, July 21st, 2017

Almost half the world’s population is online and billions of young people use social media. So why doesn’t more sex education happen across these channels?

The first Global Advisory Board for Sexual Health and Wellbeing brings together a group of individuals from across the world who are using innovative ways to reach more people with information about sex and relationships. Here are some of the projects they’ve been working on.

Child Living with HIV Maintains Remission Without Drugs Since 2008

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), July 24, 2017

A nine-year-old South African child who was diagnosed with HIV infection at one month of age and received anti-HIV treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus without anti-HIV drugs for eight and a half years, scientists reported today at the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris. This case appears to be the third reported instance of sustained HIV remission in a child after early, limited anti-HIV treatment.

“Durban 2016: the changing narrative of HIV/AIDS” – free forum

SAMESH, 26/10/2016

Invites you to their upcoming forum, “Durban 2016: the changing narrative of HIV/AIDS”.

The forum is a fantastic opportunity to hear from guest speakers who attended the 21st International AIDS Forum 2016. They will discuss the current successes and challenges in their respective fields and their thoughts on the future of HIV/AIDS advocacy and research in Australia.

Free event.

Guest speakers include:

Darryl O’Donnell: AFAO CEO
Dr Jennifer Hoy: Key researcher for HIV & HIV-related illnesses
Brent Allan: Living Positive Victoria CEO
Enaam Oudih: Manager Multicultural Services RASA
Roxana Baratosy: SIN Representative

When: Thursday 17 November, 6 – 7.30pm

Where: 57 Hyde St, Adelaide SA 5000

RSVP: Monday 14 November 2016 via 7099 5300

Wine and cheese provided.

Please see attached flyer for full event information: samesh-forum-nov-17-2016-2

Let’s talk about sex: why do we need good sex education? – podcast transcript

The Guardian, Wednesday 15 June 2016

There are 1.8 billion people aged 10 to 24 today, but how many of those are getting comprehensive sexuality education? And why, in 2016, are there still so many taboos around sex? Liz Ford discusses what young people should be taught, when sex education should start and asks, what does comprehensive sexuality education actually mean?

She visits the Women Deliver Conference in Denmark, where 5,000 delegates meet to discuss the reproductive health, rights and wellbeing of women and girls. There, she speaks to 18-year-old Dennis Glasgow, a peer educator from the Guyana Responsible Parenthood Association, who discusses the importance of diminishing the myths around sex by talking about it.

Doortje Braeken, senior adviser on adolescents and young people at the International Planned Parenthood Federation, reveals that 66% of girls don’t know what menstruation is when they have their first period.

Lucy Emmerson is coordinator of the UK’s Sex Education Forum. She says that, with good quality sex and relationship education from a trained educator, young people are less likely to start having sex at a young age, and less likely to become teenage parents. The Sex Education Forum has developed a curriculum framework that shows the kind of questions relevant to children at each stage of their development.

Remmy Shawa helps manage sex and reproductive health at Sonke Gender Justice in South Africa. He talks about the difficulties for parents in being open with children about sexuality when they can’t find the language to talk about it.

Anne Philpott, founder of The Pleasure Project, emphasises the need to convey in public health messages that sex is about enjoyment. She talks about the ease of young people’s access to pornography – essentially bad sex education, she says – and the need to discuss the stereotypes it presents, so that young people understand it’s not real life. And, Philpott says, with AIDS still the highest killer of adolescent girls in Africa, effectively spreading the message of safe sex is a top priority.

  • Read transcript here
  • Listen to podcast here