Marie Stopes Australia seeks signatories to open letter re changes to telehealth

July 2020
 
There are changes to Telehealth from Monday, July 20th which mean that clients who have not attended a service within the last 12 months – that is, new clients or clients who have not used a service in the last 12 months – will no longer be eligible for a Telehealth appointment.
 
Marie Stopes Australia has written an open letter about the impact of this change access to sexual and reproductive health services. If you are interested in endorsing the letter, you can add your name as a private individual or an organisation. 
 

Building on strengths to support Aboriginal young people’s sexual health

UNSW, originally published May 2020

The Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project ‘What We Do Well’ has reached a milestone of halfway point and completion of the first major round of data collection, conducted by Aboriginal young people trained as part of the project to interview their peers.

‘What We Do Well’ is identifying the positive actions Aboriginal young people take to reduce their sexual risk and build sexual wellbeing. By describing the social, cultural and personal strengths and resources they draw on, the research will inform sexual health promotion practice to better support Aboriginal young people.

Stigma towards people who inject drugs and sex workers prevalent, according to new Australian study

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, July 2020

Priority groups at risk of blood borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections are still likely to experience negative behaviour from the general public and in healthcare settings according to a recent report from the Stigma Indicators Monitoring Project.

86% of the general public sampled self-reported that they would behave negatively towards people who inject drugs to some extent, as did 56% of healthcare workers and 55% of healthcare students. Additionally, 64% of the general public, and 36% and 31% of healthcare workers and students respectively, self-reported likely negative behaviour (to some extent) towards sex workers.

 

 

Pride in Prevention: A guide to primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities.

Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide

Produced by Rainbow Health Victoria for the LGBTIQ Family Violence Prevention Project 2019–202, launched 30 Jun 2020

Authors: Marina Carman, Jackson Fairchild, Matthew Parsons, Claire Farrugia, Jennifer Power and Adam Bourne.

The Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide  is now available to download.

This project forges new ground in the primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities, seeking to address critical evidence gaps, strengthen understanding of the drivers of violence, and build expertise for both LGBTIQ organisations and family violence primary prevention organisations to effectively deliver evidence-based programs.

Estimates of female genital mutilation/cutting: comparison between a nationwide survey in midwifery practices and extrapolation-model

Kawous, R., van den Muijsenbergh, M.E.T.C., Geraci, D. et al. 

Estimates of female genital mutilation/cutting in the Netherlands: a comparison between a nationwide survey in midwifery practices and extrapolation-model

BMC Public Health 201033 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-09151-0

Background

Owing to migration, female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) has become a growing concern in host countries in which FGM/C is not familiar. There is a need for reliable estimates of FGM/C prevalence to inform medical and public health policy. We aimed to advance methodology for estimating the prevalence of FGM/C in diaspora by determining the prevalence of FGM/C among women giving birth in the Netherlands.

Methods

Two methods were applied to estimate the prevalence of FGM/C in women giving birth: (I) direct estimation of FGM/C was performed through a nationwide survey of all midwifery practices in the Netherlands and (II) the extrapolation model was adopted for indirect estimation of FGM/C, by applying population-based-survey data on FGM/C in country of origin to migrant women who gave birth in 2018 in the Netherlands.

 

SEXUAL HEALTH MATTERS: new clinical podcast from SHINE SA

SHINE SA, May 2020

Filled with quality clinical guidance and tips for best practice, SHINE SA’s new Sexual Health Matters – Clinical Podcast delves into the intimate regions of the body and broaches the uncomfortable conversations necessary to ensure client safety and sexual/reproductive well-being.

Through discussion, interview and explanation, experienced sexual health clinicians raise awareness of guidelines, resources, research and emerging trends to ensure that clinicians everywhere can provide excellent sexual and reproductive care to improve client outcomes.

If you have a topic you would like us to cover in future podcasts, email courses@shinesa.org.au to let us know!