How sexual assault survivors can feel in control during cervical screenings

ABC Life By Kellie Scott / 12th August 2020
Kate* avoids cervical screenings.The 34-year-old from Sydney is a survivor of sexual assault and finds the physical examination re-traumatising.

Kate’s experience is not unique.

One in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. And research shows those who have experienced sexual abuse, either as adults or children, are less likely to attend regular cervical screening.

Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from CALD backgrounds in Australia

ANROWS, June 2020

Crossing the line: Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Australia

This research set out to increase understanding of the lived experience of being a trans woman of colour living in Australia, in relation to gender transitioning and experiences of sexual violence.

Using a large comparative survey, the research situates trans women of colour’s lived experience of sexual violence within the range of sexual violence experienced by other women, including lesbian, bisexual and queer women, and heterosexual women.

This research highlights that the experiences and needs of trans women in relation to sexual violence remain poorly understood by many healthcare providers, legislators, police and policymakers, with the experiences and needs of trans women of colour being the least understood. The absence of culturally competent information and knowledge about transgender experience, accompanied by misinformation, can lead to stigma, prejudice and discrimination, resulting in unmet health and justice needs for trans women.

 

 

 

Calls for segregated mental health wards to reduce sexual assault risk

ABC (Katherine Gregory on AM), February 2020

Sexual violence against women in mental health wards is going unchecked, despite service providers’ awareness of the problem.

A new report has found women in Victorian mental health wards are vulnerable to sexual assault, harassment and violence from male patients and staff.

It’s calling for stricter separation of male and female patients in mental health wards and an overhaul of how assault complaints are dealt with.

Broadcast: 
Duration: 3min 49sec
Featuring:

– Doctor Juliet Watson, RMIT University
– Charlotte Jones, Victorian Mental Health Legal Centre

 

 

Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence

One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

Let’s make it mandatory to teach respectful relationships in every Australian school

The Conversation, May 28, 2019 5.45am AEST

Media reports of findings from the latest National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey caused a stir in recent days, with some highlighting the importance of education programs to teach young people about gender-based violence.

Schools play a significant role in educating young people about gender-based violence and helping change the underlying attitudes that lead to it.