Some women feel grief after an abortion, but there’s no evidence of serious mental health issues

The Conversation, April 26, 2018 12.36pm AEST

This week, the website Mamamia published, and then quickly removed, an article about the existence of “post-abortion syndrome” – a disorder apparently experienced by many women who have had an abortion. The article claimed this disorder has been concealed from the public and that the trauma of an induced abortion can be comparable to the experience of child sexual abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffered by war veterans.

Neither the term “post-abortion syndrome”, nor the claims about its characteristics, are supported by any national or international psychological societies. Of course, many women experience emotional responses to an abortion, which are normal reactions to a significant event.

 

 

Serving up inequality: How sex and gender impact women’s relationship with food

Women’s Health Victoria, September 2017

This issues paper explores various aspects of women’s health relating to food. These include the impacts of nutritional deficiency, the links between nutrition and chronic disease and women’s food-related behaviours.

Gender itself is a key structural determinant of women’s health and inequality, playing out in women’s roles in relation to food, in psychosocial health and the socio-economic factors that impact on access to nutritious food.

Controversy exists in public health and health promotion about the approach and key messages that should be adopted in relation to food-related behaviours and body size to promote ‘health’ and prevent illness for women. This paper outlines various perspectives in this discourse and highlights principles and recommendations for designing health promotion programs and managing the risks of public health messages.

‘Sexism’ in sexual assault research, but this time men are the target

Science Daily, July 10, 2017

Sexism is alive and well, but this time men are the target. A new study debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn’t as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn’t result in similar emotional impacts, especially depression. Men make up about 38 percent of sexual assault and rape incidents reported, and those in the military are particularly vulnerable and less likely to report an assault.

John & Tony’s story: love, brain injury, and domestic violence

news.com.au, October 14, 20159:40am

At their most severe, John’s outbursts have inflicted broken teeth and stitches to his partner Tony’s head.

It’s rare to hear someone admit to being a perpetrator of domestic violence. And what John has done is shocking. There’s no question about it. But everyone close to John attests that he was never violent before he sustained a severe brain injury nine years ago.

John’s story is surprisingly common.

With the support of Headway ADP, a specialist support service for adults with an acquired brain injury in Sydney, John hopes to seek further brain-injury specific counselling to assist him with anger management.

Read more here