Responding to LGBT conversion therapy in Australia: report

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University & Human Rights Law Centre, 2018

This report highlights the nature, extent and impact of LGBT conversion therapies in Australia.

The report is designed to help government, support services and faith communities to better respond to those experiencing conflict between their gender identity or sexual orientation and their beliefs.

Fears family violence is going undetected by psychiatrists

What is going on in gay men’s lives when they acquire HIV?

nam/aidsmap, Published: 08 September 2017

Gay men in England who have recently become HIV positive describe a complex web of factors which may have contributed to their infection, according to a qualitative study recently published in BMJ Open.

“Individuals who experienced multiple stressors, gradually over the life course or more suddenly, were especially vulnerable to HIV and being drawn into sexual risk situations, while the social environment created a context that enabled risk of HIV infection,” the researchers write. Individual and interpersonal factors frequently combined with community or structural factors, such as the widespread use of dating apps, chemsex and HIV treatment, as well as changing perceptions of the seriousness of an HIV infection.

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.

 

Forum: the experience of women in same-gender relationships experiencing domestic violence

Bfriend is supporting an afternoon of discussion regarding domestic violence within the LGBTIQ community, and specifically how women experiencing domestic violence in a same-gender relationship can be supported.

When: Thursday December 10 2015, 1-3pm

Where: Noarlunga Uniting Church Community Health Onkaparinga office, 23 Williams Road, Christies Beach

Guest speakers will include:
– Member for Reynell, Katrine Hildyard MP
– SAPOL Gay and Lesbian Liaison Officer, Sergeant Amanda Dawson
– Southern Domestic Violence Service Inc.

RSVP by 4/12/15 & for further inquiries: dvforum15@gmail.com

Download flyer here LGBTIQ Domestic Violence forum

Multicultural Workshop on Domestic Violence – free for community workers

DV-alert, October 2015

Multicultural Workshop –  19-20 November,  2015 – Adelaide 

Multicultural DV-alert workshops are delivered in partnership with recognised multicultural service providers around Australia.

Multicultural DV-alert workshops are for health, allied health and community frontline workers supporting multicultural communities in Australia.

One of the priorities of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children is to ensure that services meet the needs of women and children experiencing violence. DV-alert aims to build the knowledge and capacity of community frontline workers to provide appropriate support to women and children in Australia.

To find out if you are eligible to attend, click here for more information on the DV-alert Participant Criteria

While taking into account the unique issues and contexts faced by multicultural communities in Australia, you’ll learn how to recognise the signs of domestic and family violence, how to respond to someone experiencing domestic violence, and best practice methods should be used to refer people on to the most appropriate support service. View the course outline to find out what topics are covered.

How will I be assessed?

To get a competent mark, you will be required to complete three assessment tasks successfully:

  • Assessment 1 – Online Pre-reading and multiple-choice questions
  • Assessment 2 – Written/ Verbal Assessment
  • Assessment 3 – Skills Assessment

Participants marked competent will receive a Statement of Attainment for the unit of competency CHCDFV301A – Recognise and Respond Appropriately to Domestic and Family Violence apart from all the other benefits.

How do I sign up?

You can register online via this website to enrol for a Multicultural Workshop in your state or territory. Download the Pre-enrolment Course Information before registering.

How much will it cost?

DV-alert is government funded, so the training fee is waived for all community frontline workers to attend the course. On top of that, participants who complete the training are provided with support for travel, accommodation and staff backfill. Find out if you are eligible for financial assistance.

Find out more at http://www.dvalert.org.au/