Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here 

 

Male contraceptive jab almost as effective as female pill, trial shows

Guardian, Friday 28 October 2016

A male contraceptive jab has been shown to be almost as effective as the female pill in a trial that could pave the way for men and women being able to share equal responsibility for birth control.

In the study, 350 men were given injections of hormones that were shown to dramatically lower their sperm count by “switching off” the male reproductive system. The drugs caused some unpleasant side-effects, however, meaning that the trial had to be halted early.

The findings are reported in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

 

Oral contraceptive use and mortality

ABC Health Report, Monday 2 February 2015 5:53PM

Researchers from Boston have followed 120,000 female nurses for around 40 years, looking at their health and wellbeing, including their contraception and comparing that to cause and age at death. They wanted to find out whether oral contraceptive use is associated with total and cause specific mortality.

ABC Health Report on: Endometriosis

ABC Radio National, Monday 10 November 2014 5:50PM
Endometriosis is a common medical condition, affecting one in ten Australian women. Sufferers describe the pain as otherworldly – as if they are being torn up from their insides.
Yet the treatment options available in Australia are minimal. This is the story of a tenacious mother-daughter team who fought tooth and nail, via Twitter and Facebook, for Australia to have access for a drug to manage the pain.
  • Read transcript or listen to audio here