One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

HIV and Trans Women: A Literature Review

Transgend Health. 2018; 3(1): 239–250

Abstract:

Trans women are a key, yet under-researched, population in the HIV epidemic. However, there remains a paucity of data on the health and wellbeing of trans women at risk of, or living with, HIV in the United Kingdom.

This article provides a narrative review of key empirical research into HIV among trans women. In an effort to explore individual and social factors in relation to HIV in this population, we outline key tenets of identity process theory from social psychology and the concept of structural violence from medical anthropology.

We focus on published studies around the following themes: (1) epidemiological data, (2) syndemic factors (3) barriers to social support, (4) HIV and gender transitioning, and (5) access to and engagement with health care.

We identify lacunae and thus call for United Kingdom-based research in the following areas: (1) the prevalence and incidence of HIV in trans women, (2) the impact of syndemic factors on HIV risk and acquisition in trans women, (3) the nature of social support for coping with syndemic factors, (4) the interface of gender transitioning and HIV, and (5) barriers to accessing HIV prevention and care services.

There is great scope (and urgency) for research into HIV among trans women, especially in the United Kingdom, to reduce incidence in this group, to enhance engagement in HIV care across the care continuum, and to improve the health and wellbeing of those living with HIV. A tentative model for HIV prevention and care is presented in this article.

Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B

Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B in 2011–2016: changing migration, shifting epidemiology
Aust NZ J Public Health. 2018; 42:441-3; doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12826
Abstract
Objective: To estimate the cultural and linguistic diversity in Australians currently living with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), the majority of whom were born overseas, and to identify trends in this diversity over time.
Methods: Estimates were generated by combining Australian census country of birth
information with seroprevalence data generated from antenatal serology linked with
surveillance notifications. The number of people living with CHB was assessed according to country of birth using the 2011 and 2016 censuses.
Results: The total number of Australian residents living with CHB increased by 20% between 2011 and 2016, substantially outpacing population growth. The most common country of birth continued to be China, with the number of Chinese-born Australians living with CHB increasing by 60% in the 5-year period. Decreased numbers were observed for people born in European countries.
Conclusions: The epidemiology of chronic hepatitis B in Australia has shifted over time due to changing migration patterns, with increases in many countries in the Asia-Pacific, African and Middle Eastern regions. 
Implications for public health: Interventions to improve the health of people living with CHB are imperative, and these up-to-date estimates identify priority groups and communities, which are constantly changing.

HIV diagnoses hit seven year low: Australia’s annual HIV figures released

Kirby Institute, UNSW, Monday, 24 September 2018

Australia has recorded its lowest level of HIV diagnoses in seven years, according to a new report from the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney.

The report, released at the Australasian HIV&AIDS Conference in Sydney, found that there were 963 new HIV diagnoses in 2017, the lowest number since 2010.

Researchers are attributing the promising results to more people getting tested for HIV, more people living with HIV starting treatment which reduces the risk of HIV transmission to effectively zero, and an increased use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP, an HIV prevention pill).

However, it is not all good news. According to the report, a quarter of new HIV diagnoses in 2017 were among heterosexuals, with a 10% increase in diagnoses over the past five years.

Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, HIV diagnoses have been increasing over the past five years, with rates almost two times higher than the Australian-born non-Indigenous population in 2017.

HIV incidence in Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in Australia

The Lancet HIV: August 07, 2018

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3018(18)30135-8

Ward, J ;McManus, H; McGregor, S;  et al.

Methods

Using the National HIV Registry at The Kirby Institute at UNSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia, we collated and analysed annual HIV notification data for 1996–2015. Patients who were not born in Australia were excluded. We calculated the rates of HIV diagnoses with annual trends in notification rates for Indigenous versus non-Indigenous Australians by demographic characteristics, exposure categories, and stage of HIV at diagnosis. For missing data, assumptions were made and verified through sensitivity analyses. Annual rate ratio (RR) and 4 year summary rate ratio (SRR) trends were calculated to determine patterns of HIV diagnosis in the two populations.

Findings

Between Jan 1, 1996, and Dec 31, 2015, 11 492 people born in Australia were reported with a diagnosis of HIV, of whom 461 (4%) were recorded as Indigenous Australians and we classified the remaining 11 031 (96%) as non-Indigenous Australians. For exposure to HIV, among Indigenous Australians a higher proportion of diagnoses occurred among women, and through injecting drug use and heterosexual sex than among non-Indigenous Australians (p<0·0001). Among Indigenous Australians, we found a significantly higher SRR of HIV diagnoses among men in the period 2012–15 than in previous periods (SRR 1·53, 95% CI 1·28–1·83; p<0·0001), and significantly higher diagnosis among Indigenous women (4·92, 4·02–6·02; p<0·0001) for the entire study period than among non-Indigenous women. Concurrently, a decrease in HIV diagnoses of 1% per annum (RR 0·99, 95% CI 0·98–0·99; p<0·0001) across the study period was seen among non-Indigenous people. Indigenous Australians were more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage of HIV infection than non-Indigenous Australians (20·8% vs 15·1%; p=0·0088).

Interpretation

Greater efforts should be made to include Indigenous people in prevention strategies, particularly newer biomedical interventions, such as scale up of pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention initiatives in Australia. More involvement of Indigenous Australians in these approaches is also required to prevent widening of the gap in HIV diagnosis rates between non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australians.

 

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Our Watch, July 18th 2018

Our Watch has today launched a resource aimed at tackling the horrific prevalence of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Changing the picture contains a set of clear actions that are needed to address the many drivers of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and is aimed at encouraging, guiding and supporting a national effort to prevent this violence.

Download report:

Report Changing the picture
Six-page executive summary
Background paper

Read more of article:

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women