More than half of Aussie men report experiencing sexual difficulties

The Conversation, March 22, 2019

One in two Australian men aged 18 to 55 have experienced sexual difficulty in the past 12 months, according to data released this week.

The findings are drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, which included more than 12,000 men. Overall, 54% of sexually active men reported having at least one specific sexual problem lasting three months or more.

The men reported a range of difficulties.

Women’s Preferences for Pen1s Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models

(Note; some spelling has been changed in this post to avoid automatic spam filters for email subscribers)

PLoS ONE 10(9): e0133079. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133079

Abstract

Women’s preferences for pen1s size may affect men’s comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health.

Studies of women’s pen1s size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women’s size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect pen1s sizes in different relationship contexts.

Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to pen1s length than circumference. Women preferred a pen1s of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm) versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm) sexual partners.

These first estimates of erect pen1s size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer pen1ses only slightly larger than average.

Access full text (open access) here 

Know your chances of contracting an STI

British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Canada

A common question people have is “What are my chances of getting an STI?”  While there is no simple answer, the charts below give an estimate of your chances, when your partner has that sexually transmitted infection (STI). These charts are based on research where possible, and have been reviewed by STI experts in British Columbia. 

These charts don’t cover every situation or every STI.

For example, for HIV the charts do not address the fact that risk of transmission is even lower if your partner is on treatment for HIV and has undetectable viral load.

Here’s what the different chances mean in the charts:

  • Not passed (or possible only in theory): There is no possibility for passing the infection or it is theoretically possible, but there is no evidence that this happens.
  • Not commonly passed: This is not a common way to pass the infection but it may be possible with the right conditions (e.g., if condom breaks).
  • Can be passed:  The infection can be passed this way with the right conditions (for example, from skin which is not covered by a condom or barrier).
  • Easily passed: The infection is easily passed this way.

Links to charts:

NHS Choices examines claim that Vaginal orgasm ‘doesn’t exist’

NHS Choices, Wednesday October 8 2014

“There is no such thing as a vaginal orgasm,” says the Mail Online, in a story that suggests some women have been diagnosed with sexual disorders based on the “myth” that they can orgasm through vaginal intercourse alone.