New clinical guidelines to help with heavy menstrual bleeding

ABC Health & Wellbeing, 20/10/2017

25 percent of Australians who menstruate experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure these people have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Professor Anne Duggan, senior medical advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, said some patients were not being offered the full range of treatments.

clinical guidelines

Implementation resources

These resources can be used to promote and explain what the Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Clinical Care Standard means to health services, clinicians, patients and their carers.

 

Design Agency ‘Frog’ Redesigns The Dreaded Gynecology Exam

co.design

Cold metal. Eerie clicking sound. Torturous duck-billed shape. Yes, I’m talking about the speculum, the anxiety-inducing device that doctors use to check  vaginal health. Despite its status as an instrument of discomfort and its dark history–involving a doctor who experimented on slave women – the speculum remains to this day one of the centerpieces of the often dreaded annual pelvic exam.

A team of four designers at the global design agency Frog is on a mission to redesign it – and reimagine what it means to go to the gynecologist in the first place.

Evidence Lacking on Pelvic Exams in Asymptomatic Women

American Academy of Family Physicians, July 06, 2016 03:30 pm

In 2010, physicians performed more than 60 million pelvic examinations in the United States. And although this is a common element of physical exams, it remains unclear whether performing screening pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women significantly affects disease morbidity or mortality.

On June 28, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) tackled this issue by posting a draft recommendation statement and draft evidence review on screening asymptomatic, nonpregnant adult women for gynecologic conditions using pelvic examination.

Read more here