Naloxone is a heath intervention that can’t be effectively provided without the knowledge and social connections of PWID

nam/aidsmap, may 5th 2017

Programmes to provide naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of opiate overdose, are successful because they harness the social contexts of drug use and train drug users to be ‘indigenous public health workers’ capable of intervening in an overdose, according to a qualitative study published in the May issue of Social Science & Medicine.

Read more here 

 

Harm reduction should address the specific needs of couples who inject drugs

nam/aidsmap, 21 March 2017

The sharing of drug injecting equipment most often occurs between sexual partners, but the ways in which couples manage risks and care for each other have been largely ignored by harm reduction services, say Australian researchers.

Read more here 

 

 

Naloxone: Victoria’s rising death rate prompts calls to relax restrictions on overdose ‘antidote’

ABC news, Posted 13.12.16 

The high rate of overdose deaths in Victoria has prompted calls for a change in regulations around overdose ‘antidote’ Naloxone.

Naloxone is used to reverse the effects of opioids like heroin and oxycodone but under Australian law it can only be dispensed over the counter by a doctor or pharmacist.

The stigma can mean some users avoid asking for the drug, despite the enormous rate of overdose deaths in Victoria every year, particularly in rural or regional areas.

Read more here 

Three things you need to know about drug overdoses

The Conversation, 15 September 2014, 6.21am AEST

Overdose deaths in Australia claim an extraordinary number of lives; in 2012, fatal overdoses outnumbered road deaths for the second year in a row (1,427 overdoses to 1,338 road deaths).

Read more