Can you get gonorrhoea from kissing?

ABC Radio (Hack), 8th November 2017

In a troubling development, Melbourne researchers suspect gonorrhoea is being spread by kissing, overturning years of conventional wisdom.

Although it’s early days and not cause for alarm, there is evidence to suggest ‘throat-to-throat transmission’ may be driving the spread of gonorrhea in inner-city Australia.

It’s been generally understood you could only get gonorrhea by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has gonorrhea. Dr Vincent J Cornelisse, a sexual health physician and PhD candidate at Monash University, has been conducting research that challenges this idea.

Professor Basil Donovan, head of the Sexual Health Program at the Kirby Institute, told Hack the finding was “highly tenuous”. “You’ll need a lot more science before you put out a warning,” he said.

 

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.

 

Lives of Substance (new website)

National Drug Research Institute (NDRI), in collaboration with Healthtalk Australia, Monash University and Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH), 

The Lives of Substance website has two aims. First, it aims to support people who consider themselves to have an alcohol or other drug addiction, dependence or habit, and second, it aims to inform the public by sharing personal stories of these experiences.

The media has long been filled with stories of drug use and addiction, but these stories often rely on stereotypes and offer few clues about the range of people affected by addiction issues, the variety of experiences people have and the many ways they cope and even thrive. Lives of Substance aims to fill in the many gaps in public discussions of addiction, to counter stigmatising misconceptions, and to promote understanding and more effective community responses.

The website is based on a carefully conducted research project that collected detailed life stories of people who consider themselves to have an addiction, dependence or drug habit. These stories were analysed by a team of highly experienced researchers, and key themes were identified. These are presented here using video re-enactments, original audio recordings and written extracts from the interviews.

This website is based on qualitative research conducted in Australia by researchers from Curtin University’s National Drug Research Institute (NDRI), in collaboration with Healthtalk Australia, Monash University and the University of New South Wales’ Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH).

Access website here 

Domestic violence: men’s behaviour change program works

The Age,

Men’s behaviour change programs, many with long waiting lists, have become a common penalty meted out to perpetrators of family violence who come before the courts. But until now, there has been little Australian research.

Now a Monash University study – a comprehensive snapshot of 300 Australian men who use violence, and their partners (or ex-partners), over two years – gives cause for optimism.

Read more here