Abnormal Uterine Bleeding – RACGP seminar by Dr Amy Moten

RACGP, August 2020

SHINE SA’s Sexual Health Practitioner, Dr Amy Moten will be presenting an online webinar on behalf of the RACGP on Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.  

Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presentation in general practice with heavy menstrual bleeding affecting 25% of people who are menstruating. This presentation will discuss the common causes of heavy menstrual bleeding and other menstrual irregularities and describe appropriate investigation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding.

COST: FREE (for RACGP Members)
DATE: Tuesday 11 August 2020
TIME: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm ACST

 

Free workshop series on Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

South Australian Council on Intellectual Disability, July 2020

Sexuality and Relationships is an essential area of learning for people with an intellectual disability. Adults with intellectual disability say they want to learn together in their own right. Parents and carers can make a big difference in small ways by improving their own knowledge and using supportive approaches.

These interactive workshops will be presented in both the northern and southern suburbs of Adelaide. All workshops are free of charge.

Handouts and resources will be provided during the workshops.

Workshops for parents of people with intellectual disability: Each region will have a set of four 1-day education workshops for parents. The introductory workshop Sexuality and Disability is offered three times. It is recommended that you try to attend one of these sessions before attending others. You can enrol in one or more of the workshops. The Puberty and Adolescence Workshop will be held at the Special Education Resource Unit of the Department of Education in Henley Beach (SERU). This is so that parents of school-age children can become familiar with the range of resources available to them and their children for use at home and at school.
Other sessions will be held in a variety of venues. Parents will have first priority and support workers may also attend if numbers allow.

There will also be a series of four workshops for adults with intellectual disability.

Please see flyer for more information.

Sexual and reproductive health a COVID-19 priority (Statement)

Burnet Institute, 28 May, 2020

Burnet Institute is a member of a consortium of Australian-based non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and academic institutes concerned about the detrimental effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls globally.

The International Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Consortium, which includes Save the Children, Family Planning NSW, CARE Australia, The Nossal Institute for Global Health, and Médecins Sans Frontières Australia, is calling on the Australian Government to prioritise the needs of women and girls in its response to COVID-19.

Collectively, the consortium works across 160 countries to champion universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

It’s concerned that women and girls across the globe are struggling to access critical sexual and reproductive health care, citing evidence that COVID-19 lockdowns are likely to cause millions of unplanned pregnancies.

In the Pacific, travel to rural and remote areas have been curtailed, and physical distancing requirements have forced the cancellation of most group training on sexual and reproductive rights.

A recent UNFPA report determined that a six-month lockdown could mean 47 million women and girls globally cannot access contraception, and seven million will become pregnant.

The consortium has issued a joint statement setting out priorities to ensure Australia’s global response to COVID-19 meets the critical needs of all women and girls, including:

  • Recognise and respond to the gendered impacts of the pandemic, and the increased risk to women and girls from gender-based violence and other harmful practices
  • Improve the supply of contraceptives and menstrual health products which are being impacted by the strain and disruption on global supply chains
  • Increase flexibility in delivering sexual and reproductive health services during lockdown using innovative health delivery models such as task-sharing, tele-health and pharmacy distribution
  • Support sexual and reproductive health workers and clinics to continue delivering services sagely with access to personal protective equipment as well as training on how to refer, test or diagnose COVID-19.

 

More than half of fertility and period-tracker apps ineffective at predicting ovulation, study finds

ABC Health & Wellbeing,  17/09/2019

An Australian study of the most downloaded fertility apps has found over half didn’t perform well at predicting ovulation — which is exactly what many users are using these apps for.

The findings, by researchers at Eve Health Fertility in Brisbane in conjunction with Queensland Fertility Group, were presented at a Fertility Society of Australia conference this week in Hobart.

New Bacterial Vaginosis Fact Sheet

SHINE SA, May 2019

SHINE SA has recently produced a bacterial vaginosis fact sheet. 

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a condition where there are too many of a certain type of bacteria in the vagina. Bacteria which are normally present in small numbers can sometimes overgrow, causing bacterial vaginosis.

Bacterial vaginosis is not a sexually transmitted infection. Bacterial vaginosis can occur when conditions in the vagina change and upset the normal balance of bacteria. It can be associated with new or increased sexual activity or with other changes such as menstruation or sexually transmitted infections.

Red Book: STI & BBV resources for sex workers by sex workers

Scarlet Alliance, 2018 online edition

This web resource is a community driven project, which has incorporated the efforts of sex workers, peer educators, sex worker organisations, community organisations and health professionals across Australia. It is made by sex workers, for sex workers.

Much of the content builds on The Scarlet Alliance STI Handbook: A Reference Guide for Sex Workers to Sexually Transmissible Infection [Red Book (2009)]. Red Book is a sex worker resource by and for sex workers that was first developed in 1998 with updates in 2003 and 2009. Many sex workers would be familiar with the pocket sized Red Book that sex worker organisations have been handing out on outreach to sex worker workplaces for many years.

Sex worker resources by and for sex workers is best practice in assisting sex workers in implementing harm reduction strategies in our workplaces. The STI and BBV information provided has been checked by medical professionals and all content has gone through various consultation processes with sex workers to ensure the content in Red Book is accurate, relevant and reflects our diverse experiences, identities, contexts and needs.

Contents: