Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia

NAPWHA, May 2019

This NAPWHA report is an analysis drawing together several years’ worth of data from the main pharmaceutical industry suppliers of compassionate access antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in Australia and combines this with, for the first time, data from the State and Territory jurisdictions to produce the most accurate estimate to-date of the number of Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia. It comes with recommendations for systemic improvements.

Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

The Conversation, January 23, 2019 12.21pm AEDT

by Nicholas Medland, Sexual health physician and senior researcher, UNSW

Australia aims to “virtually eliminate” HIV transmission by 2022, according to the health minister’s new national HIV strategy. This ambitious goal has been made possible by biomedical HIV prevention, a new and highly effective way of preventing HIV using medications.

But new inequalities are emerging between those who can and can’t access these medications because of their Medicare eligibility. These inequalities may undermine the success of HIV elimination in Australia and threaten Australia’s international reputation as a safe place to study, work and live.

Read more of Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

 

Barriers to HIV testing for people born in Southeast Asia & sub-Saharan Africa

Curtin University,  2017

Over the past decade Australia has seen an increase in HIV notifications among people born in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South East Asia (SEA).

People born in these regions have the highest rates of HIV diagnosis by region of birth and are overrepresented in late or advanced presentations of HIV infection.

Previous research indicates that migrants from SSA and SEA attend health services in Australia regularly, but only 50% have ever tested for HIV.

This report provides a brief overview of the preliminary results from the Barriers to HIV
testing project – a qualitative research project using focus groups and in-depth interviews to explore the barriers and enablers to HIV testing among priority communities born in SSA and SEA, to better understand the factors influencing late
diagnosis.

Push to dispel myths about long-lasting contraception

Guardian Australia, Tuesday 26 September 2017 

Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill.

Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is low in Australia. On Tuesday the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association released a consensus statement – endorsed by 18 agencies, including SHINE SA – on the use of LARCs.

Access, equity and costs of induced abortion services in Australia: a cross-sectional study

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, January 2017, doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12641

Objectives: To examine access and equity to induced abortion services in Australia, including factors associated with presenting beyond nine weeks gestation.

Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 2,326 women aged 16+ years attending for an abortion at 14 Dr Marie clinics. Associations with later presentation assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

Conclusions: Abortion costs are substantial, increase at later gestations, and are a financial strain for many women. Poor knowledge, geographical and financial barriers restrict method choice.

Implications for public health: Policy reform should focus on reducing costs and enhancing early access.

Access abstract here (for full text access, please see your librarian)