Trans @ Work: a guide for trans employees, their employers, and colleagues

Queensland Human Rights Commission, 2019

This information is for trans and gender diverse employees, their employers, managers and colleagues who are seeking guidance on issues associated with transitioning at work.

The guidelines suggest ways to:

  • work together the achieve a successful transition in the workplace;
  • address pre-employment issues; and
  • provide ongoing support to trans employees.

Why is a trans inclusive workplace important?

For the employee:

  • staying in employment;
  • maintaining self-respect;
  • having financial security.

For the employer:

  • improving staff satisfaction and retention through modern, inclusive workplace policies;
  • enhancing public image of the organisation;
  • reaching new client groups;
  • improving teamwork and increasing productivity;
  • complying with state and federal discrimination legislation

The document also contains some real-life stories.

Transgender women taking PrEP have lower levels of PrEP drugs than cisgender men

aidsmap/nam, November 9th 2018

A study presented at October’s HIV Research for Prevention conference (HIVR4P) in Madrid shows that transgender women who are taking feminising hormones and also taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have levels of the PrEP drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine in their blood that are about 25% lower than those in cisgender men, and levels in rectal tissue cells about 40% lower. Tenofovir levels in rectal tissue were 44% lower.

However, the study also confirmed that the interaction between hormones and PrEP did not appear to go the other way; blood levels of estradiol, the one hormone all of the transgender women took in one form or another, do not appear to be affected by PrEP.

 

New standards of care for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, 2017

The first Australian Standards of Care and Treatment Guidelines for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents, led Led by the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, have been released.

Dr Michelle Telfer, Head of Adolescent Medicine and Gender Services at the RCH, says health professionals, such as GPs, school counsellors and psychologists, from around the country often seek information from the RCH but until now only international guidelines had been available.

“With 1.2% of adolescents identifying as transgender, and referrals and requests for specialist support on the rise, there is definitely a need for Australia to have its own guidelines. Trans-medicine is a relatively new area of medical practise, and most doctors didn’t get taught how to manage the care of trans children and adolescents in medical school or in their later specialist training. These guidelines, developed by leaders in this field, will help to fill this knowledge gap,” she says.

The guidelines were developed using current evidence and the input of more than 50 specialists, and they have the endorsement of the Australian and New Zealand Professional Association for Transgender Health.

The guidelines include terminology, information about the unique clinical needs, treatment information, and the role of the various medical disciplines involved in the care.

Trans and gender diverse children and teenagers, and their parents, have also been consulted along the way.

“We frequently hear that many doctors, and other clinicians, don’t feel confident in what to do or say when they come across trans or gender diverse children or adolescents for the first time. With a guide to help them through all the stages of their care, our patients’ feel that they are likely to get better care and that others will also have a more positive experience when approaching doctors or psychologists,” she adds.