Push to dispel myths about long-lasting contraception

Guardian Australia, Tuesday 26 September 2017 

Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill.

Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is low in Australia. On Tuesday the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association released a consensus statement – endorsed by 18 agencies, including SHINE SA – on the use of LARCs.

Successful male contraceptive gel trial brings new form of birth control closer

Guardian, Tuesday 7 February 2017

A male contraceptive gel has been found to work reliably in a trial in primates, bringing the prospect of an alternative form of birth control for humans closer.

The product, called Vasalgel, is designed to be a reversible and less invasive form of vasectomy and in the latest study was 100% effective at preventing conception.

  • Read more of article here
  • Read full text of paper (open access) in the journal Basic and Clinical Andrology here 

Sexual Health & Cervix Screening Update Day (for doctors, nurses, midwives and other health & community workers)

SHine SA, January 2017

The 2017 Sexual Health & Cervix Screening Update Day is presented by SHine SA and South Australian Cervix Screening Program.

This annual event is open to doctors, nurses and midwives and any other interested health and community workers.

The renewed cervical screening guidelines are to be implemented from 1 May 2017. The Update Day has been timed to coincide with the release of resources around these changes and these resources will be available on the day.

The full event program will cover:

  • Cervix screening – statistics, clinical guidelines and strategies
  • Biomedical options for HIV prevention
  • STIs and HIV in Aboriginal communities
  • Providing culturally appropriate services
  • Syphilis: An update on the great mimicker
  • Who to test and how to treat: Mycoplasma genitalium, rectal testing in women and more…
  • Emergency contraception
  • Long Acting Reversible Contraception

We are pleased to feature speakers from SA Cervix Screening Program, SAHMRI, Clinic 275, O’Brien Street General Practice, SAMESH and SHine SA for this event.

(Please see below to download the full program as a PDF)

Course Dates

Sexual Health & Cervix Screening Update Day

Date: 31/03/2017

Course Cost

$150 per person; Student discounted rate: $135 (10% discount)Lunch, morning tea and afternoon tea will be provided.

WHEN
Friday 31 March 2017
8:30 am – 5:30 pm

WHERE
Crowne Plaza, Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide

Course Outline

Enrolment

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) points will be available for this event.

U.S. Abortion Rate Continues to Decline, Improvements in Contraceptive Use Credited

Guttmacher Institute, January 17, 2017

For the first time since 1975, the number of abortions in the United States dropped under one million (958,700 in 2013 and 926,200 in 2014). The abortion rate also continued to decline.

Improved contraceptive use in recent years has led to a decline in the U.S. unintended pregnancy rate, suggesting that women are increasingly able to plan their pregnancies and therefore have a decreased need for abortions.

Mirena IUD effective for seven years: new study

Dr Jennifer Gunter, September 10 2016

The Mirena intrauterine system (IUS), the IUD with the hormone levonorgestrel, is a highly effective method of contraception currently approved for five years. Some data suggests that it probably good for six years, but a new study tells us with a good degree of confidence that the Mirena is safe and effective for seven years. 

The study was funded by UNDP/ UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research and published in the journal Contraception.

Uptake of long-acting, reversible contraception in three remote Aboriginal communities: a population-based study

Med J Aust 2016; 205 (1): 21-25. doi: 10.5694/mja16.00073

Objective: To assess the use, effectiveness and acceptance of prescribed contraception in three remote Western Australian Aboriginal communities

Conclusion: The high uptake of LARCs in these communities is consistent with international recommendations about contraception use. High acceptability was reflected in excellent continuation rates. Service delivery models that use community engagement and capacity building are recommended for broadening the focus of sexual health beyond sexually transmitted disease detection and management, giving priority to the reproductive rights and unmet needs of Aboriginal women.

  • Access Journal article here (if you cannot access the full text, please contact your librarian for assistance)