Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.

Policy Consultation Forum: LGBTIQ and youth community feedback sought

SHINE SA, August 2018

LGBTIQ and youth community feedback is sought on SA Health Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive & Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN) Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities and young people (under 30) are invited to an information session to learn about the draft Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive for SA Health as well as the draft SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. SA Health and SALHN, in partnership with SHINE SA, are facilitating an information and feedback session about these important documents. We look forward to hearing your views on the policy and model of care.

The SA Health Policy aims to provide a comprehensive overarching framework which consolidates equity and access requirements for South Australia’s diverse health consumers consistent with the South Australian Government Universal Access and Inclusion Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Policy is intended to provide strategic direction to SA Health employees, or persons who provide health care services on behalf of SA Health, to ensure that access to public health services is equitable for all South Australian health consumers.

The central purpose of the SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care is to provide high level guidance pertaining to the provision of safe and high quality care to Southern Adelaide Local Health Networks diverse mental health consumers. The core principles speak to the provision of person centred, evidence based recovery oriented care that is provided by an appropriately diverse multi-disciplinary team. Strong emphasis has been placed upon care delivery within the context of a culturally and linguistically safe service that engenders strong collaborative partnerships across agencies and between consumers, carers and health professionals. A Service Plan is being developed to operationalise the Model of Care, and both elements will be implemented in parallel once development is complete.

Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

At SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000

Free event

Light refreshments will be provided

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, hat and textmodel of care

The everyday experiences of LGBTI people living with disability

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University,  July 2018

This report documents the effects of systemic discrimination on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability.

It is divided into two key sections. The first reviews the national and international research and policy literatures on the impacts of systemic discrimination, disadvantage and social exclusion on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability and their access to services.

The second, smaller section presents preliminary analyses of unpublished data on LGBT people with disability from Private lives 2: The second national survey of the health and wellbeing of LGBT Australians (2012).

KEY FINDINGS:

The review found that research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability in Australia is fragmented, under-resourced and relies on different, sometimes contrary definitions of ‘disability’.

The review documents higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared with people with disability and LGBTI people without disability; greater restrictions on freedom of sexual expression (particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability); and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities.

It documents a lack of professional training, resources and support for disability and allied health care workers for LGBTI people with disability. It also found that many disability services and workers are unwilling to address the sexual and gender identity rights and freedoms of LGBTI people with disability.

Startling Data Reveals Half of LGBTQ Employees in the U.S. Remain Closeted at Work

Human Rights Campaign, June 25, 2018

The HRC Foundation released the results of a survey of employees across the USA, revealing the persistent daily challenges that have led nearly half of LGBTQ people to remain closeted at their workplaces — a rate largely unchanged over the past decade. 

A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers NationwideHRC’s third national workplace study over the past decade, shines a light on the often-intangible, nuanced issues in the workplace that keep LGBTQ workers “separate,” leaving many feeling distracted, exhausted or depressed, and believing they have nowhere to turn for help.

The survey of both LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ workers reveals that, despite significant progress in recent years — including the Supreme Court of the United State’s decision embracing marriage equality in 2015, as well as corporate policies and practices that increasing embrace LGBTQ inclusion, substantial barriers to full inclusion. Many of these barriers exist within interpersonal workplace connections, including non-work conversations or outings among coworkers.

  • The full report, A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers Nationwide, can be found here.

More LGBTQI content needed at medical schools – survey

Radio New Zealand,  23 June 2018

There are gaps in gender identity and sexuality education at medical schools, staff at the country’s two providers say. The findings were published in the most recent New Zealand Medical Journal, after surveying staff from both the Universities of Otago and Auckland.

Two-thirds said it was important and both schools would like to see more content and earlier education for medical students. When asked how much LGBTQI content was included in their module, 54 percent responded “none at all”, while 33 percent responded “a little.”

The survey’s author, University of Otago’s Charlene Rapsey, said education relating to gender identity and sexuality did happen but most material was not covered until a student’s third year – and it should at second year.

Australia’s health 2018 (Report)

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,  Release Date: 

 

Australia’s Health 2018 is the AIHW’s 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots.

The report also summarises the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

Australia’s health 2018: in brief is a companion report to Australia’s health 2018.

Table of contents:

Whole report:

PDF Report (17.3Mb)

Australia’s health 2018 in brief:

Companion ‘in brief’ booklet presents highlights in a compact easy-to-use format.