Public Cervix Announcement campaign

Thorne Harbour Health, September 2019

Cancer Council Victoria, November 2019

As more research reveals concerning health outcomes for lesbian, bisexual and queer (LBQ) identified women, it is encouraging that there is a shift in focus towards improving health for LBQ women from both mainstream and LGBTIQ health organisations. As part of Women’s Health Week (September 2 – 6) we thought we’d take you through one of our campaigns which was created to raise awareness around cervical screening.

The reasons why these groups don’t screen as often as they should include people thinking they don’t need to screen, feeling embarrassed or frightened and fearing homophobia or transphobia. The fact is, all LGBTIQ people with a cervix between the ages of 25 and 74, need cervical screening every five years to reduce their risk of cervical cancer, no matter who they have had as a sexual partner.

Working with Cancer Council Victoria, Thorne Harbour Health created the ‘Public Cervix Announcement’ campaign. This campaign was created to raise awareness around cervical cancer and debunk some of the myths around who should be screened.

PCA postcard

 

 

 

Sexual minority women face barriers to health care

The Conversation, October 23, 2019 9.25pm AEDT

Stigma and discrimination are common experiences that people who identify as LGBT or sexual minority face when accessing health services. One report found that one in seven LGBT people in the UK avoided seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff. As many as one in four also experienced negative remarks against LGBT people from healthcare staff.

 

When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

d

Is the world becoming more gay-friendly?

via BBC 29/05/2019

When Taiwan became the first place in Asia to legalise same-sex unions, hundreds of gay people marked the occasion by registering to marry.

It marked a significant change on the island, where the majority of people only relatively recently became supportive of same-sex relationships.

In many other places there has also been a shift – often a rapid one – towards more liberal attitudes. But these changes do not always mean full equality.

More needs to be done for LGBTIQ+ inclusion across Australia, ANZ research shows

ANZ, February 20, 2019

New ANZ research1 shows that almost half a million LGBTIQ+ community members (1 in every 4) in Australia are still not comfortable being their true selves and discussing their sexuality and gender identity with their loved ones or friends.

ANZ commissioned the research to mark its 13 year relationship with the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

ANZ’s Group Executive Australia, Mark Hand, who is also Chair of ANZ’s Diversity Council, said: “Being open about your whole identity is something that all Australians should be comfortable doing, and yet our research shows that this is not the case.”

Key research findings:

  • 84% of LGBTIQ+ community members believe there are still parts of Australia where it is unsafe to be LGBTIQ+. And 68% of non- LGBTIQ+ think so too.
  • 68% of Aussies support efforts to improve LGBTIQ+ equality.
  • LGBTIQ+ community members are still twice as likely to experience some form of harassment, discrimination or open prejudice because of their sexual orientation.
  • 52% of LGBTIQ+ community members would not open up about their sexuality with their manager at work.

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding LGBTI+ Lives in Crisis (Report)

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University & Lifeline Australia, February 2019

This research report presents findings of lesbian (L), gay (G), bisexual (B), transgender (T), intersex people (I), and other sexual identity and gender diverse individuals (+) use of crisis support services (CSS) in Australia.

This is the first research of its kind in Australia that explores the needs of LGBTI+ people during a time of personal or mental health crises. It focuses on their uptake and familiarity with crisis support services in Australia, their perceptions and experiences with crisis support services, and where they might seek other professional mental health service support during a time of crisis.

This study enhances the evidence base for those working to design, resource or deliver services to meet the needs of LGBTI people in Australia during times of crisis.