Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

Identifying and Plugging the Leaks: Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

CTAC (Canadian Treatment Action Council), 2018

This project explored what issues impact engagement by people living with HIV with healthcare in Ontario. The goal was to identify policy issues that impact treatment access for people living with HIV, and to identify opportunities to make the healthcare system more accessible.

The HIV Cascade of Care is a useful description of the different steps that a person living with HIV will need to take in order to achieve an undetectable viral load and optimal health outcomes, from infection and diagnosis through to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) initiation and viral suppression.

We know people drop out of the HIV Cascade of Care – e.g. why those starting treatment don’t stay on it. By seeking out policy barriers and developing solutions we can enable people to live long, healthy, and happy lives.

The project has five recommendations around barriers to engagement in the HIV Cascade of Care.

Download report here

 

Landmark report tells stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with disability

 

Anchorage Statement: Indigenous Peoples and Viral Hepatitis

2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis, August 2017

The Anchorage Statement is a statement on Indigenous Peoples and Viral Hepatitis, which was prepared by Indigenous peoples globally who attended the 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis held in Anchorage Alaska in August 2017.

The Anchorage Statement sets out the aspirations of Indigenous peoples globally in ensuring that they are not a population left behind in global efforts to eliminate viral hepatitis by the year 2030.  The statement is timely for Australia as the Commonwealth Government are embarking on the development of a new set of national strategies addressing viral hepatitis, HIV and STIs and the 5th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STI and BBV Strategy.  Those who have prepared the statement ask you consider the actions and principles embedded in the Anchorage Statement, and hope you or your organisation can contribute to the global efforts of elimination of viral hepatitis.

Feel free to post the Anchorage Statement to social media, websites and or discuss in staff meetings within your own organisation.

What is Sexual and Reproductive Justice?

NYCHealth, Nov 2017, Updated Feb 2017

Sexual and reproductive justice (SRJ) exists when all people have the power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction.

SRJ means that every person has the human right to:

  • Choose to have or not have children
  • Choose the conditions under which to give birth or create a family
  • Care for their children with the necessary social support in a safe and healthy environment
  • Control their own body and self-expression, free from any form of sexual or reproductive oppression

The term “reproductive justice” was coined by a group of black women in 1994. From this group, a framework and Sister Song, a collective led by indigenous women and women of colour, emerged.

NYCHealth has made a video explaining this.