New booklet: Vulva & vaginal irritation

Jean Hailes, Last updated 05 May 2017

Jean Hailes has just released a new patient information booklet: The vulva: irritation, diagnosis & treatment. 

Contents:

  • What is normal?
  • Causes of vulva irritation
  • Management & treatment
  • Dryness
  • ‘Good bacteria’ versus ‘bad bacteria’ in the vagina
  • Other natural therapies
  • Irritation
  • Diagnosis
  • Secretions or discharge
  • Odour
  • Probiotics
  • What is the vulva?

Download booklet (PDF) here 

 

 

Knowing your labia (radio on demand)

Triple R radio,18.04.2017

What does a “normal” labia look like? What is driving the increased demand of labioplasty? These are some of the questions leading to the creation of The Labia Library, an initiative from Women’s Health Victoria.

It provides access to unaltered images of women’s labia, in order to dispel concerns and myths due to the rise of censored and altered images in pornography. Dr Amy Webster of Women’s Health Victoria joins the Breakfasters on Triple R radio to discuss this vital resource.

  • Listen here (please note this link does not work in all browsers: we had success with Explorer, but not with Chrome).

Future prospects for new vaccines against STIs

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, February 2017 – Volume 30 – Issue 1 – p 77–86
This review provides an update on the need, development status, and important next steps for advancing development of vaccines against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including herpes simplex virus (HSV), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea), Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia), and Treponema pallidum (syphilis).

Major progress is being made in addressing the large global unmet need for STI vaccines. With continued collaboration and support, these critically important vaccines for global sexual and reproductive health can become a reality.

  • Full text (open access) available here

Responding to Female Genital Mutilation as a women’s health issue (forum)

SHine SA, January 2017

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons (WHO). It is also sometimes referred to as female genital cutting or female circumcision. There are 83,000 women and girls who have been affected by FGM in Australia. FGM has no health benefits but causes lifelong health consequences for women and girls.

Our ReFRESH forum will consist of a presentation on the topic and a personal experience of FGM. The aim is to provide participants with a better understanding of FGM. We will explore where, when, how and why FGM is practised, and how to care for survivors.

When: 9 February 2017

Where: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time: 1.30 – 4.30 pm

Cost: $50 (Student Concession $45)

Light refreshments provided

FURTHER INFORMATION & ONLINE ENROLMENT here

Enquiries: Phone 8300 5320 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer here: FGM Forum

Mystery of the female orgasm may be solved

Guardian, Monday 1 August 2016

The purpose of the euphoric sensation of the female orgasm has long perplexed scientists, as it is not necessary for conception, and is often not experienced by women during sex itself. Now researchers in the US say they might have found its evolutionary roots. Human female orgasm, they say, might be a spin-off from our evolutionary past, when the hormonal surges that accompany it were crucial for reproduction.

  • Read more here
  • Access journal paper The Evolutionary Origin of Female Orgasm here

 

‘We don’t know if your baby’s a boy or a girl’: growing up intersex

Guardian, Saturday 2 July 2016

Jack was born with both male and female anatomy, with ovarian and testicular tissue, and genitals that could belong to either a boy or a girl. He has one of at least 40 congenital variations, known collectively as disorders of sexual development (DSD), or intersex traits. It was months before Juliet and her husband, Will, were told Jack’s specific diagnosis, of mixed gonadal dysgenesis. While they waited, all his parents knew was that Jack’s sex couldn’t be determined at birth, and that their doctors needed time to assign it.

Jack’s specific diagnosis is rare, but being born with a blend of female and male characteristics is surprisingly common: worldwide, up to 1.7% of people have intersex traits, roughly the same proportion of the population who have red hair, according to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Read more here