New study shows Americans are having sex less often, especially young people

San Diego State University,  7 March 2017

According to a new study published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior today, Americans who were married or living together had sex 16 fewer times per year in 2010-2014 compared to 2000-2004.

A critical factor appears to be birth cohort, with later-born generations having sex less often than those born earlier in the 20th century.

  • Read more here
  • View study abstract here (see your librarian for full text)

Survey of middle-aged Canadians finds more sex and pleasure, less condom use

SIECCAN, June 2016

New research by Trojan condoms with the Sex Information and Education Council of Canada (SIECCAN) surveyed 2,400 Canadians between the ages of 40 and 59 about their sex lives.

63 per cent said they’re more sexually adventurous than they were a decade ago. 65 percent reported their last sexual encounter as being “very pleasurable.”

Findings also showed that two-thirds of single men and almost three-quarters of single women in the survey said that they didn’t use a condom the last time they had sex. More than half of those men had more than two partners in the past year. Almost three-quarters of single women said they did not use a condom the last time they had sex, and a third of those had more than two partners in the past year.  

56 per cent of single men and 61 per cent of single women are “not very concerned” or “not at all concerned” about contracting an STI. Lack of concern seems to be translating into high risk behavior.

  • View the press release here
  • Download the research preliminary report (PDF) here

 

 

 

 

 

Better access to contraception means more sex for married couples, says research

ScienceDaily, January 26, 2016

Married couples in low- and middle-income countries around the world that use contraception are having more frequent sexual intercourse than those that do not, new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Read more here

Third survey of sex in Britain – results summary

ABC’s The Science Show, Saturday 31 October 2015 12:53PM

When HIV and AIDS took hold in the late 1980s, British researchers knew very little about the sexual behaviour of the population. It made predicting how HIV might spread almost impossible. This prompted a national survey of sexual practice which has been carried out every ten years since. Soazig Clifton and Clare Tanton discuss some recent findings and changes over time.

  • Read transcript or listen to audio of The Science Show here
  • Access survey results summary from University College London here

How patterns of injecting drug use evolve in a cohort of PWID

Australian Institute of Criminology, June 2015

This study examines some of the ways in which injecting drug use evolves over time in a cohort of People Who Inject Drugs. It shows shifts in the settings in which cohort members reported buying and using their drugs. These shifts have important implications for the harms experienced by PWID, and the wider community.

Read more here