Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia

NAPWHA, May 2019

This NAPWHA report is an analysis drawing together several years’ worth of data from the main pharmaceutical industry suppliers of compassionate access antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in Australia and combines this with, for the first time, data from the State and Territory jurisdictions to produce the most accurate estimate to-date of the number of Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia. It comes with recommendations for systemic improvements.

Understanding LGBTI+ Lives in Crisis (Report)

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University & Lifeline Australia, February 2019

This research report presents findings of lesbian (L), gay (G), bisexual (B), transgender (T), intersex people (I), and other sexual identity and gender diverse individuals (+) use of crisis support services (CSS) in Australia.

This is the first research of its kind in Australia that explores the needs of LGBTI+ people during a time of personal or mental health crises. It focuses on their uptake and familiarity with crisis support services in Australia, their perceptions and experiences with crisis support services, and where they might seek other professional mental health service support during a time of crisis.

This study enhances the evidence base for those working to design, resource or deliver services to meet the needs of LGBTI people in Australia during times of crisis.

Substance misuse – the gender divide explained

Alcohol and Drug Foundation, February 21, 2018

Men generally consume harmful substances at higher rates than women – this is true both within Australia and internationally. But while the research points to the prevalence of substance misuse disorders among women in Australia as being around half that of men, they are more likely to be socially criticised as a result of their use/misuse.

This criticism stems from the continuation of traditional gender-based roles assigned to women within our society, which in turn generates and perpetuates social and institutional stigma. One of the end results of this is a reduction in women seeking out treatment services for alcohol and other drug-related (AOD) issues. Which, in turn, has reduced the opportunity for research into many of the gender-specific factors that drive women’s AOD misuse, as well as reducing the quality and efficacy of AOD treatment services for them.

The barriers to medical abortion [in Australia]

Australian Journal of Pharmacy,  08/06/2017

Australian women are choosing medical abortion less often than international peers because there are barriers to access, argue two experts.

in countries where mifepristone has been available for some time, about half of women seeking to terminate a pregnancy choose it over surgical termination. Access in Australia is relatively recent, and at this stage only about a third of women seeking abortion choose the medical route.

 

Access, equity and costs of induced abortion services in Australia: a cross-sectional study

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, January 2017, doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12641

Objectives: To examine access and equity to induced abortion services in Australia, including factors associated with presenting beyond nine weeks gestation.

Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 2,326 women aged 16+ years attending for an abortion at 14 Dr Marie clinics. Associations with later presentation assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

Conclusions: Abortion costs are substantial, increase at later gestations, and are a financial strain for many women. Poor knowledge, geographical and financial barriers restrict method choice.

Implications for public health: Policy reform should focus on reducing costs and enhancing early access.

Access abstract here (for full text access, please see your librarian)

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing

DSCI & SA Health, 2016

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing was produced for the South Australian Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) and the Department for Health and Ageing (SA Health).

Over the last three decades, numerous reports and studies have highlighted substantial variations in the wellbeing across the South Australian population, and the gaps between those who are doing well, and those who are not. These differences, or ‘inequalities’, are readily apparent across Adelaide, and our rural and remote communities, as they are in other areas of Australia.

This atlas describes the extent and significance of inequalities in individual and community wellbeing, particularly those associated with wider social and economic influences; and points to areas where the impacts of disadvantage across the lifespan, and, in many cases across generations, need to be addressed.

The atlas includes a number of communities in Adelaide and rural and remote parts of the State, identified by these Departments (DCIS and SA Health):

  • Playford and Salisbury in the outer north,
  • Onkaparinga, in the outer south;
  • Those in Regional South Australia are the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Aboriginal Community, Ceduna and Peterborough.

The information, presented as a series of indicators, highlights these inequalities and draws attention to the influence of social, economic and environmental factors on health and wellbeing. The ensuing picture is one of significant differences in outcomes in these communities, compared with similarly located areas.

Download atlas (PDF) here