The sex lives of young women marked by frustration, stress, guilt and embarrassment

Monash University, 24 Feb 2020

Professor Susan Davis, a leading Monash University expert on women’s health, admits it was a highly ambitious project: minutely studying the sexual wellbeing of 7000 young Australian women with particular focus on complicated, intimate ideas such as desire, arousal, orgasm, responsiveness and self-esteem.

Now that it’s done (and published this week in the international journal Fertility and Sterility), she’s “very concerned.” The main finding is that half of the women studied experience personal “distress” related to sex. One in five has at least one sexual dysfunction. “Young” means aged 18 to 39. The concern, she says, is because “sexual wellbeing is recognised as a fundamental human right”.

“This is a wake-up call to the community,” she says. “This is what we [society] are doing to people. We expected to find that a meaningful number of young women had sexual issues, but we were not expecting to find half were distressed sexually.”

International consensus on testosterone treatment for women

Jean Hailes, 2 September 2019

The first Global Position Statement on the use of testosterone in the treatment of women, led by the International Menopause Society (IMS), was published in four leading international medical journals today.

The statement has been authored by a diverse team of leading experts based around the world and has been endorsed by internationally-esteemed medical societies.

It follows years of debate regarding testosterone therapy for women and, for the first time, provides agreement among experts and medical societies about how testosterone could be prescribed for women.

Access the statement: 

Do Estrogen Therapies Affect Sexual Function in Early Postmenopause?

JAMA Internal Medicine, 2017

Transdermal estrogen therapy delivered through the skin modestly improved sexual function in early postmenopausal women, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Declining estrogen levels around the menopausal transition are commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, which can be an important determinant of women’s health and quality of life.

In the new article, Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., of the Yale School of Medicine, and his coauthors report on an ancillary study of a clinical trial that examined changes in sexual function in recently postmenopausal women.

 

New website for FGM information in Australia

August 2015

No FGM Australia is a not-for-profit organisation which aims to protect Australian girls from female genital mutilation, and to support and empower survivors of FGM. They have recently launched their new website, which contains information resources, and a reporting mechanism for suspected FGM on Australian girls. 

Their resources are tailored to specific professions:

  • social workers
  • GPs
  • teachers
  • child care workers nurses & midwives
  • police
  • immigration officers
  • lawyers

There is also information on FGM and the law.

  • Access professional resources here
  • Access FAQs about FGM here
  • Report a suspected case of FGM involving a child – information here

 

Sexual problems equally common after C-section and vaginal birth

Reuters, Fri Mar 6, 2015 1:50pm EST

After giving birth, women often struggle with reduced sexual desire and arousal, but how they delivered – by caesarean or vaginally – is not to blame, a small study suggests.

Read more here

Link found between pain during or after sexual intercourse and mode of [baby] delivery

Eureka Alert, 21-Jan-2015

Operative birth is associated with persisting pain during or after sexual intercourse, known as dyspareunia, suggests a new study published today (21 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

Read more here