Documentary gives insight into risks of sexual assault among Australia’s international students

ABC NewsRadio Breakfast, First posted 27/04/2018 at 09:02:46
Half a million international students, most from Asia, are enrolled to study in Australia. It’s the country’s third largest export industry, worth $18 billion.

But Australia’s reputation as a safe and sunny place to study is under threat after widespread disclosures of rape and sexual assault.

Australia: Rape on Campus follows a six-month investigation into sexual assault at the country’s universities, exploring how international students, far from home and family, are especially at risk.

It follows an Australian Human Rights Commission survey which found 1.6 percent of students experienced sexual assault in a university setting in 2015 or 2016, one in five were international students.

Journalist Aela Callan is behind the documentary and she spoke to ABC’s Fiona Ellis-Jones from Berlin.

Her documentary, Australia: Rape on Campus, will be screened on Al Jazeera.

Australian sex workers fear US anti-trafficking laws could make the internet off limits

ABC News, 10/4/2018

Think about the tools you use for work, and then imagine a legal change on the other side of the world could take them out of your hands.

Sex workers fear that could happen in Australia if a contentious US bill becomes law. It’s aimed at making websites liable if they’re used to facilitate “sex trafficking”.

Like every profession, sex work is increasingly online, which means it often occurs on American web platforms.

 

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.