‘People are scared’: the fight against a deadly virus no one has heard of

Guardian Australia, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

An Aboriginal woman – we’ll call her B – is sitting in a dry creek bed outside her community and telling the world “this is a very bad disease. But we have to talk in a way not to shame people. Not telling them straight out. Telling them gently and quietly.”

B is talking about a sickness that has killed her family member and is a potential tragedy facing Aboriginal communities in central Australia, who have the world’s highest rates of a fatal, human immune virus for which there is no current cure, no treatment and no coordinated public health response.

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is transmitted through sexual contact, blood transfusion and from mother to child by breastfeeding. It can cause a rapidly fatal form of leukaemia. Some people die within weeks of diagnosis. HTLV-1 also causes inflammation of the spinal cord leading to paralysis, severe lung disease known as bronchiectasis and other inflammatory disease.

In five communities around Alice Springs, more than 45% of adults tested have the virus, a rate thousands of times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians.

Syphilis jumps to WA: doctors say ‘complacent’ safe sex attitudes to blame

ABC News, 17/03/2018

Some sexually transmitted diseases are on the rise in Western Australia, with Aboriginal communities in the north hit particularly hard by a syphilis outbreak.

Australian Medical Association president Omar Khorshid said Aboriginal people in the north had been failed.

“It’s really sad that we’ve actually had and outbreak of syphilis that started in north Queensland that’s gone right across the north of Australia, through the Northern Territory and into the Kimberley through our Aboriginal populations,” Dr Khorshid said.

“In this day and age, in a medical system that’s had a cure for that condition for many decades, the fact we are still seeing an outbreak of such an easily treated infectious disease really says a lot about our failure as a community to deal with the health issues in our Aboriginal communities.”

 

 

Gonorrhoea ‘super-superbugs’ triple in six months [in Australia]

SMH, 13/02/2018

Cases of a strain of gonorrhoea impervious to an antibiotic have almost tripled in six months, the latest report from the National Alert System for Critical Antimicrobial Resistance (CARAlert) reveals.

The result was a “warning shot across the bow” for doctors and public health officials fighting antibiotic resistance, CARAlert’s senior medical adviser said.

Spread the Cure – Wipe Hep C off the Map – Free webinar

 Merck Sharp & Dohme

According to estimates, Australia can completely eradicate hep C in about 10 years. But your involvement is needed.

This practical webinar will allow you to gain knowledge and get involved in this important public health initiative.

After attending this webinar, you should be able to:

  • Understand benefits of highly effective new hep C treatments for your patients
  • Understand rationale of a treat-to-prevent strategy for hep C
  • Define GPs’ central role in screening, diagnosis and treatment of hep C
  • Screen, diagnose, assess and treat hep C patients based on the tools provided.

Speaker: Dr Stephen Pianko, is Head of Clinical Trials at Monash Health in Gastroenterology. Stephen has been involved in the treatment of hepatitis C for the past 25 years.

Webinar details: 14th September 2017.

NSW/TAS/ACT/VIC/QLD: 8.00-9.45 pm
SA/NT: 7.30-9.15 pm
WA: 6.00-7.45 pm

epid
The webinar is  aimed at doctors and nurses interested in treating Hepatitis C, although anyone can dial in.

Early warning system exposes the rise of the gonorrhoea ‘super-superbug’

The Age, July19th 2017 – 8:32 AM

A critically drug-resistant strain of gonorrhoea dubbed a “super-superbug” has been detected in every Australian state and territory by a new national surveillance system.

The National Alert System for Critical Antimicrobial Resistance (CARAlert) identified 1,064 bacteria highly resistant to last-line antibiotics between 17 March 2016 and 31 March 2017 across 73 laboratories.

Scientists warn that antibiotic-resistant gonorrhoea is on the rise

WHO, 07 July 2017

Every day, more than 1 million sexually transmitted infections are acquired worldwide, and each year an estimated 78 million people are infected with gonorrhoea. New data from 77 countries show that antibiotic resistance is making gonorrhoea much harder – and sometimes impossible – to treat.

The data has been published in PLOS, in two new scientific articles.