Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence

One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

The ‘revolutionary’ programs giving hope to LGBT domestic violence survivors

Updated 

Studies show people in same-sex relationships experience domestic violence at similar — and possibly higher — rates as opposite-sex couples.

But until recently survivors have suffered in silence and worse, been ignored and misunderstood by the health professionals and police who are supposed to help them, because of the persistent stigma and shame surrounding LGBT abuse and misconceptions that especially lesbian couples are immune from it.

Nearly half of female healthcare workers in Australia have experienced domestic abuse: study

ABC News, 3/7/18

A landmark investigation into female medical staff in Australia has found nearly half have experienced domestic violence, including one in 10 who had been abused by their partner in the past year alone.

The study, published in the BMC Women’s Health journal, involved 471 doctors, nurses and health professionals in Victoria and is believed to be the first to examine the link between domestic violence and female medical staff.

 

Rosie in the Classroom: Lesson plans for teachers

Rosie, a national harm prevention initiative by the Dugdale Trust for Women & Girls.

Rosie in the Classroom is an educational program based on the original Rosie Videos, created to assist teachers in talking about difficult but important topics.

Topics like sexting or respect in relationships should be incorporated into the curriculum so that all teenagers are aware of their rights and can encourage respect within their school community. Each module includes a downloadable lesson plan and video which can be screened in class.

These lesson plans have been written by Briony O’Keeffe, lead teacher at Fitzroy High School and facilitator of the Fitzroy High School Feminist Collective.

 

A team effort: preventing violence against women through sport

Our Watch, November 2017

Sport is an integral part of Australian culture and it is woven into the fabric of the everyday lives of many Australian individuals, families and communities.

Change the story: a shared national framework for the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia identifies it as a key setting for the prevention of violence against women in Australia.

On and off the field, sport has great potential to influence social change and prevent violence against women by creating inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe environments for men and women, boys and girls.

Sport has the capacity to influence, inform and shape attitudes and behaviours in both negative and positive ways. Sporting environments are places where violence against women can occur directly and, if allowed, can provide a setting for entrenched violence-supportive attitudes and behaviours to be played out. However, this doesn’t have to be the way. Sport can be a leader to empower, motivate and inspire change, on and off the field. Sport is a powerful environment to connect boys and girls, men and women with vital information, skills and strategies to push for inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe sporting spaces for everyone.

The challenge is to extend the notion of equality and fairness into the core business of sport by addressing the drivers of violence against women and stop it before it starts.