Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses in South Australia, 2017

Communicable Disease Control Branch, SA Health, 2018

In 2017, there were 8,181 new notifications of STIs and BBVs in South Australia. This figure represents a 7% increase in the number of new notifications compared to notifications received in 2016, and a 14% increase compared to the five year average (2012-2016).

In 2017, there were 5,910 notifications of genital chlamydia making this the most commonly notified STI in South Australia.  The notification rate of chlamydia in 2017 was 343 per 100,000 population, and has been stable over the past five years.

There were no notifications of donovanosis in 2017.

There were 1,271 notifications of gonorrhoea in 2017. The notification rate of gonorrhoea increased from 45 per 100,000 population in 2014 to 74 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 158 notifications of infectious syphilis in 2017, the highest number of annual notifications in the past 10 years.

There were 60 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The notification rate of newly diagnosed HIV infection in 2017 was 3.5 per 100,000 population, above that in 2016 of 3.1 per 100,000 population. The notification rate in the Aboriginal population rose to 9.6 per 100,000 in 2017, up from 4.8 per 100,000 in 2016.

There were 11 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis B infection in 2017, above the five year average (2012-2016) of nine cases per year. There were 272 notifications of unspecified hepatitis B virus infection reported in 2017. The notification rate has declined in the Aboriginal population over the past five years.

There were 32 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis C in 2017. The majority of cases were males (75%). The notification rate of unspecified hepatitis C infection was 23 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 10 new diagnoses of hepatitis D infection in 2017, which is consistent with the five year average of 10 notifications per year.

 

 

 

 

‘Surveillance of STIs and blood-borne viruses in South Australia, 2015’: report

SA Health, January 2017

The SA Health report ‘Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses in South Australia, 2015’ is now available for downloading from the SA Health website.

The Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) conducts surveillance for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and blood borne viruses (BBVs) in South Australia under the legislative framework of the South Australian Public Health Act, 2011. The surveillance system in South Australia utilises a dual notification strategy where the laboratory and the diagnosing medical practitioner provide information on each episode of infection. A person could be notified more than once during the reporting period and with the same or more than one type of infection. Information collected as part of the notifiable diseases surveillance system is entered into a database at the time of notification and analysed.

Download report here

2016 Aboriginal Surveillance Report of HIV, viral hepatitis, STIs

Kirby Institute, UNSW, November 2016

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to experience a disproportionate burden of disease. HIV notification rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men have doubled over the past five years and rates of chlamydia, gonorrhoea and infectious syphilis are 3, 10 and 6 times greater than the non–Indigenous population in 2015, with even more substantial differences in remote and very remote areas.

  • Access report summary here
  • Download full report (PDF) here 

Australia’s annual report card on HIV, hepatitis and STIs

Guardian, 14 September 2015

Australia’s HIV contraction stabilises but 1,000 a year still return positive tests:

The number of Australians contracting HIV has stabilised but about a thousand people a year are still returning positive tests, and about a quarter of those people have had the virus for at least four years without realising it.

The latest report card on the nation’s sexual health, by the University of New South Wales’s Kirby Institute, is a mixed bag. It is the nineteenth annual review of available surveillance data pertaining to the occurrence of HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections in Australia.

  • Read more here
  • Download 2015 Annual Surveillance Report of HIV, viral hepatitis, STIs here
  • Download 2015 Aboriginal Surveillance Report of HIV, viral hepatitis, STIs here

 

New annual report on STIs & blood-borne viruses in South Australia

Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB), SA Health, August 2015

SA Health publishes annual reports on sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses in South Australia. The 2014 report has just been released.

A total of 7258 new notifications of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and blood borne viruses (BBVs) were received in South Australia in 2014. This represents a 23% increase in notifications received by the Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) in the five year period since 2010.

Chlamydia remains the most frequently reported STI in South Australia.

  • Download report (PDF) to read more here
  • Download other reports on notifiable conditions here

 

Bloodborne viral and sexually transmitted infections in ATSI people: surveillance & evaluation report 2014

The Kirby Institute 2014

This surveillance report provides information on the occurrence of blood borne viruses (BBVs) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

Download report here