When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

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Understanding the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work

Diversity Council Australia, 2019

While many workplaces have developed LGBTIQ+ inclusion programs, they are not currently specifically addressing the cultural diversity of LGBTIQ+ people.

DCA, along with Pride in Diversity, is undertaking research to help better understand the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work.

This project will help with understanding of the experiences of people of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds, and will assist in providing informed advice to workplaces about how to make inclusion initiatives work.

  • Are you or one of your colleagues an LGBTIQ+ person from a non-Anglo or a non-Main English speaking country cultural background?
  • Can you share your insights to help develop workplace guidance for Australian organisations wanting to better harness the skills and talents of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds?

What do I need to do?

Connecting country: busting myths about Indigenous Australians (podcast)

Diversity Council of Australia, 2 Oct 2018

This 20-minute episode doesn’t just feature a beautiful Welcome to Country, but also attempts to connect Country by exploring the cultural and professional gaps that exist for Indigenous Australians at work and asking: where do these issues come from? Why do they persist? And what can we do to finally close the gap?

Helping answer these questions is Linda Burney – the first Aboriginal woman to serve in the House of Representatives, and the first Aboriginal person to serve in the NSW Parliament – as well as Karen Mundine, CEO at Reconciliation Australia.

Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Produced and written by: Andrea Maltman Rivera. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese. Contributions from: Catherine Petterson and Simone Empacher Earl. Special thanks to Audiocraft. Welcome to Country by Aunty Norma Ingram.peer

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned.  The following podcast may contain voices of deceased people.

Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.