Withdrawing Depo-Provera contraceptives would result in more lives lost than HIV infections prevented

aidsmap / nam,  11 January 2018

Even if Depo-Provera and other contraceptive injections raise the risk of HIV infection, withdrawing them from use in African countries would greatly increase maternal mortality, a modelling study has shown. The loss of life due to pregnancy complications and unsafe abortions would far outweigh the number of HIV infections prevented, according to the study published in the December issue of Global Health: Science and Practice.

Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here 

 

Uptake of long-acting, reversible contraception in three remote Aboriginal communities: a population-based study

Med J Aust 2016; 205 (1): 21-25. doi: 10.5694/mja16.00073

Objective: To assess the use, effectiveness and acceptance of prescribed contraception in three remote Western Australian Aboriginal communities

Conclusion: The high uptake of LARCs in these communities is consistent with international recommendations about contraception use. High acceptability was reflected in excellent continuation rates. Service delivery models that use community engagement and capacity building are recommended for broadening the focus of sexual health beyond sexually transmitted disease detection and management, giving priority to the reproductive rights and unmet needs of Aboriginal women.

  • Access Journal article here (if you cannot access the full text, please contact your librarian for assistance)

Why do certain hormonal contraceptives increase the risk of HIV?

American Society for Microbiology, 1st September 2015

In recent years, evidence has been building that injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera or DMPA) is associated with an increased risk of HIV infection. Now a study published in the September 1st issue of mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, provides a biological explanation for the phenomenon.

Read more here

 

 

 

follow-up to post “Depo-Provera Linked to Increased HIV Risk in Africa”

Hi SASHA readers,

Some people have pointed out that the link in the previous post “Depo-Provera Linked to Increased HIV Risk in Africa” goes to a login page which locks them out. I found the article through google, and it turns out you can only access it in you go in that way, i.e. via google results. I was not aware of this when i posted it.

Cheers,

SASHA

 

Depo-Provera Linked to Increased HIV Risk in Africa

Medscape, January 09, 2015

The injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone (Depo-Provera or DMPA) is associated with elevated risk for HIV infection among women in low-income or middle-income countries of sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study.

The mechanism behind a link between DMPA and HIV infection is not known.

Read more here