An end to direct questioning by abusive partners in family law proceedings

Women’s Legal Services Australia, 10th May 2017

Women’s Legal Services Australia (WLSA) welcomes the Australian Government’s announcement that it will be introducing legislation to amend the Family Law Act 1975 to prohibit the direct cross-examination of victims of violence in family law proceedings.

Being directly questioned in court by an abusive ex-partner is not only traumatising it also affects the victim’s ability to give evidence.  This can prevent important information being made available to the court to protect children from violence in family law proceedings. Ending the cross-examination by violent ex-partners is a practical and important step to empower victims to give evidence without fear.

The Government has also announced additional funding for Community Legal Centres, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services and the family law court system. WLSA welcomes greater investment in these areas.

  • You can read the media release in response to the announcement here
  • You can read the Australian Government’s announcement here

Interpersonal violence & LGBTIQ communities: Understanding & responding to experiences of LGBTIQ clients

Addressing Violence Alliance (AVA)

Featuring experts and dynamic guest speakers on current best practice policies and practice when working with LGBTIQ communities and their experiences of violence.

This forum will cover policy & research perspectives, organizational & practitioner perspectives, as well as gaps and future advocacy goals.

Including
· Dr Niki Vincent (Commissioner for Equal Opportunity)
· Dr Philomena Horsley – Gay & Lesbian Health Victoria (La Trobe University)
· Dr. Damien Riggs (Flinders University)
· Personal Story
· Worker Wellbeing session

Who should attend?
Policy makers, managers, team leaders and front-line staff working in the area of supporting victims of violence and/or with members of LGBTIQ communities.

Why
A NSW Study found 85% of the lesbian and gay community in NSW had experienced homophobic abuse, harassment or violence during their life. (1) LGBTIQ people are also as likely to be victims of domestic and family violence as non-LGBTIQ women, which equates to approximately 1 in 3. (2)
1. Attorney General’s Department NSW, 2003
2. LGBTIQ D&FV Interagency and University of NSW, 2014

Tickets

$50 from http://ywca.com.au/avaforum2017/

Where
Victim Support Service
33 Franklin Street, Adelaide
When
Thursday 20 April 2017, 8:30am – 4:30pm
Contact
Clare Tatyzo T: 08 8203 9413
E: Claire.Tatyzo@ywca.com.au

Who

The Addressing Violence Alliance (AVA) is a collaborative partnership between a number of lead agencies in the community services, health and criminal justice sectors. AVA is committed to increasing the capacity of the South Australian workforce in responding to and preventing violence.

Download flyer here AVA LGBTIQ Forum 2017

HIV Conference slams spitting laws in SA, WA & NT

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM)

 Adelaide: Friday, 18 November 2016

Delegates at Australia’s national HIV/AIDS conference have condemned the governments of South Australia, Western Australia and Northern Territory over laws that force people accused of criminal offences to undergo mandatory HIV and blood-borne virus testing.

The conference passed a resolution this afternoon expressing its ‘profound disappointment’ in the laws, which make it mandatory for people to undergo blood tests if they are accused of spitting on or biting law enforcement personnel. The laws were passed in South Australia and Western Australia in 2014, and in the Northern Territory in 2016.

Read more here

Lives of Substance (new website)

National Drug Research Institute (NDRI), in collaboration with Healthtalk Australia, Monash University and Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH), 

The Lives of Substance website has two aims. First, it aims to support people who consider themselves to have an alcohol or other drug addiction, dependence or habit, and second, it aims to inform the public by sharing personal stories of these experiences.

The media has long been filled with stories of drug use and addiction, but these stories often rely on stereotypes and offer few clues about the range of people affected by addiction issues, the variety of experiences people have and the many ways they cope and even thrive. Lives of Substance aims to fill in the many gaps in public discussions of addiction, to counter stigmatising misconceptions, and to promote understanding and more effective community responses.

The website is based on a carefully conducted research project that collected detailed life stories of people who consider themselves to have an addiction, dependence or drug habit. These stories were analysed by a team of highly experienced researchers, and key themes were identified. These are presented here using video re-enactments, original audio recordings and written extracts from the interviews.

This website is based on qualitative research conducted in Australia by researchers from Curtin University’s National Drug Research Institute (NDRI), in collaboration with Healthtalk Australia, Monash University and the University of New South Wales’ Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH).

Access website here 

Improving Cultural Understanding & Engagement with People from ATSI Communities

Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: Practical learnings to improve your practice (Webinar)

1800RESPECT , October 2016

The details

When: Thursday, December 1, 2016

What Time: 01:00 PM AEDT

Duration: 45 minutes

Where: Online – wherever you like!

Presenter: Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Cost: Free!

What’s your timezone?

NSW, ACT, VIC, TAS: 1.00 pm – 1.45pm

SA: 12.30 pm – 1.15 pm

QLD: 12.00 pm – 12.45 pm

NT: 11.30 pm – 12.15 pm

WA: 10.00 am – 11.45 pm

About the webinar

Family violence is a serious problem for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around the nation. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised and twice as likely to die as an outcome of family violence compared to other Australian women. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over nine times as likely to be on care and protection orders and ten times more likely to be in out of home care than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. There are also lower reporting rates as women are known to face specific and additional barriers to reporting in their communities. The impacts of family violence are compounded by the fact that survivors of violence may not have access to culturally appropriate services or supports, may be distrustful of the justice system, and already experience significant socioeconomic disadvantage and marginalisation.

This webinar will explore the complexities of domestic and Aboriginal family violence, provide insights into greater Aboriginal cultural competency and community engagement, and share best practice approaches to recognising and responding for frontline workers across all sectors.

You can make a difference by watching this webinar and finding out what you can do to help break the cycle of violence, and increase the safety of women and children.

Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Craig is currently the CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY) an Aboriginal not for profit organisation based in Adelaide that works closely with the specialist homelessness and domestic violence services state wide.

Craig currently holds a range of representative positions including the Minister appointed – Aboriginal Community Leadership Reference Group – providing crucial advice regarding the government response to the Nyland Child Protection Systems Royal Commission Report to cabinet, South Australian Council of Social Services (SACOSS), the Coalition of Women’s Domestic Violence Services and the Coalition for Men Supporting Non-Violence.

He recently launched The Aboriginal Family Violence Program (AFVP) focusing on women who want to stay in their relationships. The program recognises the importance of culturally appropriate safety responses for Aboriginal women and children experiencing family violence.

Register here 

SpeakEasy Podcast (blood borne viruses and people who use drugs)

Annie Madden and Professor Carla Treloar have dedicated much of their lives to working in taboo fields of research: blood borne viruses and drug users. These two brilliant minds bring a wealth of expertise, knowledge and insight to real world subjects in SpeakEasy, holding engaging conversations with very special guests each episode.

Episodes so far:

  • Ep 1: We don’t know what we don’t know
  • Ep 2: Happy World Hepatitis Day: What’s happening in hep C treatment?
  • Ep 3: Men who have sex with men and hep C
  • Ep 4: In conversation with Eileen Baldry: Prisons, health and justice
  • Ep 5: The PROM Queen
  • Ep 6: Is justice really blind?

Access podcast series here