HIV life expectancy ‘near normal’ thanks to new drugs

BBC news, 11 May 2017

Young people on the latest HIV drugs now have near-normal life expectancy because of improvements in treatments, a new study in The Lancet suggests.

Twenty-year-olds who started antiretroviral therapy in 2010 are projected to live 10 years longer than those first using it in 1996, it found.

Doctors say that starting treatment early is crucial to achieve a long and healthy life.

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

 

nam/aidsmap, published: 14 March 2017

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle.

“Durban 2016: the changing narrative of HIV/AIDS” – free forum

SAMESH, 26/10/2016

Invites you to their upcoming forum, “Durban 2016: the changing narrative of HIV/AIDS”.

The forum is a fantastic opportunity to hear from guest speakers who attended the 21st International AIDS Forum 2016. They will discuss the current successes and challenges in their respective fields and their thoughts on the future of HIV/AIDS advocacy and research in Australia.

Free event.

Guest speakers include:

Darryl O’Donnell: AFAO CEO
Dr Jennifer Hoy: Key researcher for HIV & HIV-related illnesses
Brent Allan: Living Positive Victoria CEO
Enaam Oudih: Manager Multicultural Services RASA
Roxana Baratosy: SIN Representative

When: Thursday 17 November, 6 – 7.30pm

Where: 57 Hyde St, Adelaide SA 5000

RSVP: Monday 14 November 2016 via 7099 5300

Wine and cheese provided.

Please see attached flyer for full event information: samesh-forum-nov-17-2016-2

People living with HIV and access to health care in NSW: A Community Survey

Positive Life NSW, 2015

The NSW Ministry of Health (NSW MoH) requested Positive Life NSW (PLNSW) produce a discussion paper which explored the future service needs of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in NSW with complex care needs, in relation to HIV specialists and mainstream services.

The main lines of inquiry which PLNSW investigated were:

 Access to Service Provision – where PLHIV obtained their primary health care and why they preferred to use a particular service; (p7-8)

 Service Satisfaction – how satisfied PLHIV were with the services they received; (p7)

 Health Care Service Barriers – what concerns or difficulties PLHIV experienced when accessing health care services; (p15-17)

 PLHIV Criteria for Service Access – what were the considerations for accessing health care; (p14)

 Mainstream Service Barriers – if PLHIV experienced difficulties or challenges when referred to mainstream or specialist services, what they might be, and; (p19)

 Factors of Retention in Care – factors relating to the ability of PLHIV to remain engaged in treatment and care (p21).

Download report (PDF) here 

Above-Normal Death Rate Still Seen in U.S. Youngsters and Young Adults With HIV

The Body Pro, February 25, 2016

Despite improved health because of better antiretroviral therapy, HIV-positive teens and young adults in the United States still have a 31 times higher death rate than youngsters the same age in the general population.

Most deaths resulted from HIV-related conditions, and most deaths involved people with a low CD4 count, a high viral load, or not taking antiretrovirals.

Read more here

 

 

HIV-related factors increase risk of stroke

nam/aidsmap, produced in collaboration with hivandhepatitis.com, 15 March 2016

HIV-related risk factors seem to increase the risk of stroke – the sudden death of brain cells due to a rupture or obstruction of blood vessels in the brain – according to ongoing research in a growing number of large epidemiological cohort studies.

In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors for stroke, HIV-related factors such as viral load and CD4 cell count were significantly associated with the risk of stroke in one study.

Read more here