Clinical Education Forum Recording: Contraception Update

SHINE SA, November 2018

Clinicians:  SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Forum by Dr Amy Moten on the topic of Contraception.

This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers emergency contraception and new formulations of the Pill.

3 Category 2 RACGP Points can be awarded on completion of the forum.

Recording length: 1 hour 18 minutes

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to the call to ban Diane-35

SHINE SA, issued 13th December 2017

SHINE SA believes everyone should have access to contraceptive choices, and that decisions about contraception are best made in conjunction with a healthcare professional.

Cyproterone acetate pills, commonly known as Diane-35 appear to be associated with a higher risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) than levonorgestrel (LNG) containing pills, although the overall risk is still very low for most people.

For those who choose combined pills, we recommend as first choice the pills with lowest risk: those containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone as their progesterone. However, the other progestogen choices, which all carry a small increased risk of DVT compared to LNG, may be utilised if specific added benefits are required. Health professionals can review over time the experience individuals may have with their contraceptive choice.

Cyproterone acetate can be used as treatment for signs of androgenisation in people such as severe acne (involving inflammation or nodularity, or risk of scarring) where prolonged oral antibiotics or local treatment alone have not been successful, or idiopathic hirsutism of mild to moderate degree. The oral contraceptive pill containing cyproterone acetate can also provide effective oral contraception in this patient group.
People who have concerns should seek advice from their doctor before stopping their oral contraceptive pill.

Download Media release (PDF): Response to the call to ban Diane-35 SHINE SA Diane35_13 Dec 17_FS

 

Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here