Decriminalisation of sex work in south Australia (SHINE SA Media Release)

SHINE SA,  

On 31 May 2019, the Sex Industry Network (SIN) will gather at Parliament House to rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry and to recognise International Sex Workers Day.

In South Australia sex work is criminalised, prohibiting sex work so that those engaging in relevant activities can be prosecuted for criminal offences. SIN and Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Workers Association) advocate for decriminalisation which is seen as a best practice model by sex workers and community-based organisations.

In a recent statement SIN said:

“Sex work is skilled labour. We deserve the same industrial protections as any other worker in South Australia and, currently, what sets us apart is the criminalisation of the industry within which we CHOOSE to work.”

Natasha Miliotis, Chief Executive of SHINE SA said:

“We support the work of SIN and their advocacy for the decriminalisation of sex work in SA.

Amnesty International, the United Nations and the World Health Organization have all called for the full decriminalisation of consensual sex work as the scientific evidence is now clear – criminalisation itself leads to harm¹.

From a public health perspective decriminalisation is important to not only reduce stigma and discrimination, but to improve the health and safety of workers, clients and the broader community².”

For more information on SIN’s celebration of International Sex Workers Day and the rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry visit www.sin.org.au.

For further information contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development via email  or via telephone on 0434 937 036

 

 

¹ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30532209

² https://theconversation.com/new-report-shows-compelling-reasons-to-decriminalise-sex-work-83955

Time to fully decriminalise sex work

 The Age, 

There are only two places in the world where sex work is fully decriminalised: New Zealand and New South Wales. Everywhere else in Australia, it is partially criminalised, even though many of the concerns raised about sex work by the general public or by legislators are already addressed by existing legislation: there are laws for disturbing the peace, there are noise curfews, laws regarding indecent exposure.

Most sex workers carefully guard their privacy and are cautious about outsiders knowing what they do. People who have done sex work will keep their history secret so as not to be defined by it once they’ve moved on. Sex workers with children can find the fact of their occupation used against them in custody battles.

Faced with those risks, many sex workers resist the regulation and therefore work outside the law. That has important legal, health and safety impacts.

SA police ‘cleaning up’ sex work industry ahead of decriminalisation, parliamentary committee told

ABC News, 22/02/2017

Police have seized cars, computers, phones, and loose change belonging to people suspected of working in the sex industry, a South Australian parliamentary committee has heard.

Read more here 

Adelaide brothels raided in ‘heavy handed’ attack on industry, sex workers say

ABC News, 15/2/2017

A major crackdown on massage parlours and brothels across Adelaide has forced sex workers into risky private work where they are more vulnerable to violence and crime, according to the Sex Industry Network (SIN).

Read more here 

Respectful and Inclusive Work Practices (LGBTI Communities and Sex Workers): Workshop

SIN and SHIne SA, Jnaury 2017

Respectful and Inclusive Work Practices (LGBTI Communities and Sex Workers): Workshop for Health and Community Workers, GPs, Nurses and Midwives

LGBTI Communities: 

This workshop aims to provide health workers with the knowledge and skills to incorporate into their practice a culture of safety and respect for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) staff, clients or other stakeholders.
Implementing such an approach benefits the practitioner, the client and organisations as a whole by creating a culture that values and upholds diversity of all kinds.

Sex Worker Sensitivity Training:

It is estimated that 1 in 64 South Australian women will engage in sex work at some point in their life. Sex Industry Network (SIN) is a South Australian peer organisation, offering support services to local sex workers. Come along and be educated by the experts around all aspects of sex work, and how to engage respectfully with sex workers, in order to provide the best possible services to this marginalised group of people.

When
Friday 10 February 2017
10.00 am – 4.00 pm
Where
SHine SA
64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Cost
$150 (Student concession $110)
Includes lunch & refreshments

Enquiries
Email: shinesacoursesATshinesa.org.au

Online sex industry provides critical safety & health protections for male sex workers

BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, July 7th, 2016

Newly published peer review research shows how the loss of ‘Boystown’—the main sex work stroll for men in Vancouver—over the last decade, has led to loss of community and social solidarity; key protective strategies for sex workers. At the same time, the shift to online sex work for men has provided critical safety and health protections for sex workers in screening prospective clients and negotiating terms of transactions.

  • Read more of press release here