Serving up inequality: How sex and gender impact women’s relationship with food

Women’s Health Victoria, September 2017

This issues paper explores various aspects of women’s health relating to food. These include the impacts of nutritional deficiency, the links between nutrition and chronic disease and women’s food-related behaviours.

Gender itself is a key structural determinant of women’s health and inequality, playing out in women’s roles in relation to food, in psychosocial health and the socio-economic factors that impact on access to nutritious food.

Controversy exists in public health and health promotion about the approach and key messages that should be adopted in relation to food-related behaviours and body size to promote ‘health’ and prevent illness for women. This paper outlines various perspectives in this discourse and highlights principles and recommendations for designing health promotion programs and managing the risks of public health messages.

Managing Chronic Hepatitis B – Advice for GPs (SHINE SA video)

SHINE SA, July 2017

Today, July 28th, is World Hepatitis Day.

There are no ‘healthy carriers’ of hepatitis B!

SA Health & SHINE SA are promoting a 6-minute video providing advice for general practitioners in diagnosing, managing and contact tracing patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), to assist in preventing serious liver disease.

It is now known that people who were previously considered to have ‘unresolved hepatitis B virus carrier state’ in fact have CHB. CHB requires lifelong recall and monitoring for disease progression, even when asymptomatic. It is estimated that South Australia has 14,400 people with CHB, 6,600 (46%) who are undiagnosed.  Current clinical guidelines recommend that patients with CHB should be monitored at least annually by their GP for disease progression and suitability for anti-viral treatment.

This video provides clinical advice from the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Viral Hepatitis Centre Co-Directors Dr Edmund Tse (Head of Hepatology) and Dr David Shaw (Head of Infectious Diseases), Margery Milner (Viral Hepatitis CPC) and Dr Sam Elliott, a GP and Hepatitis B s100 Community Prescriber.

Changes to cervical screening in Australia, new guidelines

Cancer Screening, Australian Government,  Page last updated: 01 March 2017

Based on new evidence and better technology, the National Cervical Screening Program will change from 1 December 2017 to improve early detection and save more lives.

The Renewal of the National Cervical Screening Program will be implemented on 1 December 2017.  Until the renewed National Cervical Screening Program is implemented, our world-class cervical cancer screening program will continue.

From 1 December 2017, the two yearly Pap test for women aged 18 to 69 will change to a five-yearly human papillomavirus (HPV) test for women aged 25 to 74. Women will be due for the first Cervical Screening Test two years after their last Pap test.

The changes include:

• women will be invited when they are due to participate via the National Cancer Screening Register

• the Pap smear will be replaced with the more accurate Cervical Screening Test

• the time between tests will change from two to five years

• the age at which screening starts will increase from 18 years to 25 years

• women aged 70 to 74 years will be invited to have an exit test

Until the renewed National Cervical Screening Program is implemented, women aged between 18 and 69 years who have ever been sexually active should continue to have a Pap test when due.

  • You can find the new guidelines here 

Closing the Gap: Six of seven targets ‘not on track’, life expectancy gap unchanged

The Age, February 14th, 2017

Australia is not on track to close the life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the divide widening and deaths increasing when it comes to cancer, the ninth annual Closing the Gap report has found.

 

Position statement on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination

VAC, 2015/2017

Community members have recently been expressing interest in human papillomavirus vaccines (HPV) in online discussions. Health bodies in both the UK and Ireland have recommended that all gay and bisexual men receive the vaccine in order to reduce their risk of certain cancers.

VAC developed a position statement on this issue back in July 2015 in association with Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, which states that VAC believes the vaccines should be made available free of charge to all gay, bisexual and other MSM under the age of 26, and to all people living with HIV.

Download the position statement (PDF) at this link: PositionStatement_HPVvaccination_JULY2015

Alarm sounds as thousands of WA teenagers skip HPV vaccine

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The State Government has sounded the alarm at thousands of WA teenagers missing out on cancer protection because they are not completing their full course of the human papilloma virus vaccine.

The HPV vaccine was considered a medical breakthrough when introduced 10 years ago for its protection against cancers including of the throat and cervix, and genital infections.

Read more here