‘Sussing that doctor out’: Experiences of people affected by hepatitis C regarding private GPs in SA

‘Sussing that doctor out.’ Experiences and perspectives of people affected by hepatitis C regarding engagement with private general practitioners in South Australia: a qualitative study

BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Nov 29;18(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12875-017-0669-2.

Abstract

Background: Australians with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can access affordable Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatments with high cure rates (>90%), via General Practitioners (GPs). Benefits from this treatment will be maximised if people with HCV readily disclose and engage with private GPs regarding HCV-related issues. Investigating the perceptions and experiences of people affected by HCV with GPs can allow for this pathway to care for HCV to be improved.

Methods: In 2013–2014, 22 purposively sampled participants from South Australia (SA) were interviewed. They a) had contracted or were at risk of hepatitis C (n = 10), b) were key workers who had clients affected by HCV (n = 6), and c) met both a) and b) criteria (n = 6). The semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.

Results: People affected by HCV viewed GPs as a source of general healthcare but, due to negative experiences and perceptions, many developed a strategy of “sussing” out doctors before engaging with and disclosing to a GP regarding HCV-related issues. Participants were doubtful about the benefits of engagement and disclosure, and did not assume that they would be provided best-practice care in a non-discriminatory, non-judgemental way. They perceived risks to confidentiality and risks of changes to the care they received from GPs upon disclosure.

Conclusion: GPs may need to act in ways that counteract the perceived risks and persuade people affected by HCV of the benefits of seeking HCV-related care.

Cervical Screening Update recording now available!

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SHINE SA, August 2018

SHINE SA is proud to present our pilot Clinical Education Forum recording. This recording is available free of charge,  and access is limited to three months only.

Topic: Cervical Screening Update

Presenters: Megan van Zanten & Dr Amy Moten

The forum ensures your knowledge of the National Cervical Screening Renewed Guidelines is accurate and in line with best practice principles.

  • To watch the recording click the link here and set up a free account/sign in. Under Course Categories click Clinical Education to find the course, and then click Enrol Me. You can now watch the recording.

International Best Practice Guide to Equality on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Outright, April 2018

Headquartered in New York City, OutRight is the only global LGBTIQ-specific organization with a permanent presence at the United Nations in New York that advocates for human rights progress for LGBTIQ people. This guide highlights promising progress from some countries in early or interim stages of introducing measures which safeguard sexual and gender minorities from harm.

It is intended to offer tools and ideas which can support states considering how to ensure equality for sexual and gender minorities. As there is no one way to ensure equality, this guide explores different countries that have initiated different solutions suitable to their national contexts.

Table of Contents:

Introduction
Reforming Laws and Policies
Constitutional Protections
Case Study: Fiji
Law Reform
Case Study: Botswana
Improving Health Outcomes
Case Study: Jamaica
National Leadership Statements
Changing Attitudes
Case Study: Pakistan
Legislation Inspiring Policy Reform
Case Study: Belize
Holistic Reforms
Case Study: Malta
Conclusions

Download report International Best Practice Guide to Equality on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

New round of ‘HOW2 Create LGBTI Inclusive Services’ starts in July!

SHINE SA, June 2018

Take action towards your diversity and inclusivity goals this year!  The new round of SHINE SA’s HOW2 Create Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Intersex (LGBTI) Inclusive Services program commences next month. 

This program can provide your organisation with a practical way to work towards increasing inclusivity and celebrating diversity

The program is based on a set of 6 national standards developed by Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV), in conjunction with QIP (Quality, Innovation & Performance), known as Rainbow Tick Accreditation. First session is on Thursday 5 April 2018.

Four sessions held 6-8 weeks apart combined with workplace activities provide participants with increased knowledge and capacity in:
1. Auditing your service
2. Consulting consumers
3. Educating colleagues
4. Developing and implementing an action plan
5. Managing obstacles
6. Evaluating changes

This program, presented by SHINE SA, is based on a set of 6 national standards developed by Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV), in conjunction with QIP (Quality, Innovation & Performance), known as Rainbow Tick Accreditation.

SESSION DETAILS:

Tasks are assigned prior to the first session and at the end of sessions 1, 2 & 3. These tasks involve practical activities at participants’ workplaces to start the change management process towards accreditation.

Important: Organisations can choose to be assessed against the 6 national standards through an external process undertaken by QIP in order to achieve the Rainbow Tick. The HOW2 training program can support organisations seeking to achieve this accreditation and is suitable for any organisation seeking to become more inclusive for LGBTI clients and staff.

WHEN:

First session: Thursday 12 July 2018
Second session: Thursday 23 August 2018
Third session: Thursday 4 October 2018
Final session: Thursday 15 November 2018

TIME:

9:30am – 2:30pm

WHERE: 

SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Participants are required to attend all 4 sessions.

COURSE COST:

$990 (incl. GST) per participant

A minimum of 2 participants are required to attend from each organisation (min. 2 participants = $1980)

ENQUIRIES:

Holley Skene on holley.skene@shinesa.org.au or (08) 8300 5325

Behavioural Support Practice Guides for young people with a disability

University of NSW

University of NSW’s Intellectual Disability Behavioural Support Program has released practice guides for behaviour support programs for young people with a disability.

  • Being a planner with a person with disability and complex support needs

This Planning Resource Kit is intended to strengthen existing good practice and to provide guidance for engaging a person with complex support needs in planning. The kit is aimed at workers in planning or related roles, such as case managers or service coordinators, who engage with people with complex support needs.

  • Understanding behaviour support practice guide: children 0-8 years

The purpose of this guide is to assist in the prevention and reduction of the development of challenging behaviour in young children aged 0–8 years. The development of challenging behaviour can place additional strain on families and support systems and their capacity to provide effective support to the child. It is intended that this material will assist support networks to address early stages of the development of challenging behaviour and to maintain capacity for effective support.

  • Understanding behaviour support practice guide: children 9-18 years

The purpose of this guide is to assist in the prevention and reduction of the development of challenging behaviour in children and young people aged 9–18 years. The development of challenging behaviour can place additional strain on families and support systems and their capacity to provide effective support to the child/young person. It is intended that this guide will assist support networks to address early stages of the development of challenging behaviour and to maintain capacity for effective support

 

Police, families not told of sexual assault reports by mental health patients [Report]

The Age, 29 March 2018

Sexual assault claims made by mental health patients are not being reported to police or even the alleged victims’ families in most cases, a scathing report has revealed.

Families are told of allegations in only a quarter of cases, while police reports are made only 40 per cent of the time, leaving alleged victims at risk of further abuse.