Pregnancy outcome statistics (SA)

Pregnancy Outcome Unit, SA Health: November 2016

The Pregnancy Outcome Unit undertakes statewide monitoring of pregnancy characteristics and outcomes to identify population groups most at risk and determine preventive interventions. This is undertaken through data collections.

Each year, the Pregnancy Outcome Unit publishes two annual reports.

Pregnancy Outcome in South Australia provides annual analyses on pregnancies, obstetric care and the health of newborn babies. Additionally, this report also contains information on abortion rates, home births, numbers of babies born by caesarian section in private and public hospitals and the percentage of women who smoke during pregnancy.

  • The latest report was released in November 2106, and covers the period 2014. Download 2014 report (PDF) here 
  • Previous reports back to 2001 can be found here 

 

Decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

“It pains me because as a woman you have to breastfeed your baby”: decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

Sex Transm Infect 2016;92:331-336 doi:10.1136/sextrans-2015-052224

Abstract

Objectives UK guidance advises HIV-positive women to abstain from breast feeding. Although this eliminates the risk of postnatal vertical transmission of HIV, the impact of replacement feeding on mothers is often overlooked. This qualitative study examines, for the first time in the UK, decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV.

Methods Between 2010 and 2011, we conducted semistructured interviews with 23 HIV-positive African women who were pregnant or had recently given birth. We recruited participants from three HIV antenatal clinics in London.

Results Women highlighted the cultural importance of breast feeding in African communities and the social pressure to breast feed, also describing fears that replacement feeding would signify their HIV status. Participants had significant concerns about physical and psychological effects of replacement feeding on their child and felt their identity as good mothers was compromised by not breast feeding. However, almost all chose to refrain from breast feeding, driven by the desire to minimise vertical transmission risk. Participants’ resilience was strengthened by financial assistance with replacement feeding, examples of healthy formula-fed children and support from partners, family, peers and professionals.

Conclusions The decision to avoid breast feeding came at considerable emotional cost to participants. Professionals should be aware of the difficulties encountered by HIV-positive women in refraining from breast feeding, especially those from migrant African communities where breast feeding is culturally normative. Appropriate financial and emotional support increases women’s capacity to adhere to their infant-feeding decisions and may reduce the emotional impact.

Read article (open access) here

 

‘We don’t know if your baby’s a boy or a girl’: growing up intersex

Guardian, Saturday 2 July 2016

Jack was born with both male and female anatomy, with ovarian and testicular tissue, and genitals that could belong to either a boy or a girl. He has one of at least 40 congenital variations, known collectively as disorders of sexual development (DSD), or intersex traits. It was months before Juliet and her husband, Will, were told Jack’s specific diagnosis, of mixed gonadal dysgenesis. While they waited, all his parents knew was that Jack’s sex couldn’t be determined at birth, and that their doctors needed time to assign it.

Jack’s specific diagnosis is rare, but being born with a blend of female and male characteristics is surprisingly common: worldwide, up to 1.7% of people have intersex traits, roughly the same proportion of the population who have red hair, according to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Read more here

Boy, girl or …? Dilemmas when sexual development is atypical

The Conversation, March 11, 2016 6.19am AEDT

Some babies are born with a genetic variant that leads to atypical sexual development. It can result in the child being neither a typical boy nor girl.

Estimates of this occurring range from one in 1,500 or 2,000 births, to 4% of all births, depending on what definitions are used.

Read more here

Risk of catching Zika virus through sexual transmission far higher than thought, WHO says

ABC radio,Wednesday, March 9, 2016 12:35:47

The World Health Organization (WHO) says it appears the risk of catching the mosquito-borne Zika virus through sexual transmission is far higher than thought.

And the complications for unborn babies are far broader than previously feared.

Read more or listen to audio here

For African women with HIV, not breastfeeding is not easy

Reuters,

Healthcare providers need to understand that for HIV-positive African women, following advice not to breastfeed in order to protect their babies from the virus takes a high emotional toll, a U.K. study suggests.

Read more here