HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

It’s time to lift the restrictions on medical abortion in Australia – Professor Caroline de Costa

The Conversation, April 1, 2019 6.13am AEDT

Over the past thirteen years, many Australian women have used the drug mifepristone (RU486) to bring about a medical abortion.

Rather than undergoing a surgical abortion in a clinic or hospital operating theatre, a medical abortion is induced by taking drugs prescribed by a doctor.

But while mifepristone has been available in Australia since 2006, only some women, in some parts of the country, are able to access it. Professor Caroline de Costa argues in the Medical Journal of Australia that this needs to change.

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper: Second Edition, 2019

Australian Women’s Health Network Inc., 2019

The Australian Women’s Health Network first published its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper in 2012. Since then significant work has been undertaken across Australia in this area and a number of its recommendations have been implemented. This has resulted in a robust on going public conversation and a greater understanding of women’s sexual and reproductive ill health, its impact, what drives it and how best to prevent it. These gains have only been possible through continuing evidence-informed advocacy, research and practice development.

In light of the new knowledge and experience available, and changes to the political, organisational and social landscape in 2019, the Australian Women’s Health Network has updated its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health paper to produce
this Second Edition.

This paper advocates for a rights-based approach to ensuring all women can access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care appropriate to their needs,
regardless of their location, age, sexuality, financial status and religious and cultural background. It explores seven key areas through which good sexual and reproductive
health for Australian women can be achieved.

These are:

1. promoting positive and respectful attitudes to sex and sexuality

2. developing women’s health literacy

3. increasing reproductive choice

4. facilitating women’s health throughout pregnancy and birth

5. expanding prevention and treatment of reproductive cancers and menstrual issues

6. improving prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

7. equipping the health workforce to better respond to women’s health needs.

More than half of Aussie men report experiencing sexual difficulties

The Conversation, March 22, 2019

One in two Australian men aged 18 to 55 have experienced sexual difficulty in the past 12 months, according to data released this week.

The findings are drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, which included more than 12,000 men. Overall, 54% of sexually active men reported having at least one specific sexual problem lasting three months or more.

The men reported a range of difficulties.

Liver cancer death rate rising: study

SBS News, 9/4/19

The rate of liver cancer deaths and diagnoses has increased substantially in the past three decades, yet researchers say little has been done to help Australians most at risk.

While it is considered a relatively rare type of cancer – nearly 2000 people were diagnosed in 2014 – the high mortality rate and increasing incidence of diagnosis has been concerning, researcher Barbara de Graaff says.

Rates were highest in the Northern Territory, mostly due to a higher prevalence of hepatitis B and C.