Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

 

nam/aidsmap, published: 14 March 2017

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle.

HIV Futures 8: Women Living with HIV in Australia

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, 2017

In 2015, there were just under 3,000 women living with (diagnosed) HIV in Australia, representing around 10% of the overall number of Australians currently living with HIV. The experience of living with HIV can be very different for women than it is for men. 

HIV Futures 8 is a survey about the health and wellbeing of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in AustraliaThe study is designed to inform the Australian National HIV Strategy and guide community and clinical service provision for PLHIV. Findings from HIV Futures 8 are presented as a series of short reports.

The 74 women who completed the survey were aged between 19 and 80 years, with a median of 49 years. HIV Futures 8 is a broad survey covering issues such as financial security, housing status, antiretroviral treatment use, general health issues, stigma and discrimination, clinical and support service use, aging, drug and alcohol use, sexual health, relationships, and social connectedness.

  • Download report (PDF)  here 

LGBT Seniors Are Being Pushed Back Into the Closet

The Atlantic, August 31 2016

Reluctance to reveal their sexual identity is widespread among non-heterosexual senior citizens in long-term care. A recent national survey of this population by the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging—which provides support and services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender elders—found that the respondents were frequently mistreated by care-center staff, including cases of verbal and physical harassment, as well as refusal of basic services. Some respondents reported being prayed for and warned they might “go to hell” for their sexual orientation or gender identity.

 

Aged Care Workers and HIV & Ageing (Resource)

ASHM, 2015

Over the last 35 years, HIV has been transformed from what was once a fatal
illness to a chronic condition that people can now easily manage. Therefore,
people with HIV are able to live longer and reach old age. As people living
with HIV start to access aged care services, what effect will this have on the
Aged Care Worker and the role they perform?

This booklet was developed for Aged Care Workers who work in a range of
residential facilities and in the community providing services to clients in their
own homes. The booklet provides basic information about HIV and the effect
of HIV and HIV treatment on the ageing process.

Download resource (PDF) here

Let’s talk about sex over 60: condoms, casual partners and the ageing body

The Conversation, July 29, 2015 6.06am AEST

Over the past few years we’ve seen a dramatic rise in the rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among Australians aged 60 years and older. To understand why STIs are on the rise, we need to know more about older people’s sexual and romantic relationships, their knowledge of STIs and safe sex, and the safe sex practices that they use.

  • Read more here
  • To access the SexAge&Me Survey (for Australian residents aged over 60), click here