Free workshop series on Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

South Australian Council on Intellectual Disability, July 2020

Sexuality and Relationships is an essential area of learning for people with an intellectual disability. Adults with intellectual disability say they want to learn together in their own right. Parents and carers can make a big difference in small ways by improving their own knowledge and using supportive approaches.

These interactive workshops will be presented in both the northern and southern suburbs of Adelaide. All workshops are free of charge.

Handouts and resources will be provided during the workshops.

Workshops for parents of people with intellectual disability: Each region will have a set of four 1-day education workshops for parents. The introductory workshop Sexuality and Disability is offered three times. It is recommended that you try to attend one of these sessions before attending others. You can enrol in one or more of the workshops. The Puberty and Adolescence Workshop will be held at the Special Education Resource Unit of the Department of Education in Henley Beach (SERU). This is so that parents of school-age children can become familiar with the range of resources available to them and their children for use at home and at school.
Other sessions will be held in a variety of venues. Parents will have first priority and support workers may also attend if numbers allow.

There will also be a series of four workshops for adults with intellectual disability.

Please see flyer for more information.

Recognise and Respond to Disclosures of Rape and Sexual Assault -1 Day Training

Women’s and Children’s Health Network, June 2018

This training is designed for workers in all areas of human services and health
care. The focus will be on providing knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to
provide appropriate trauma informed response to adults who have been raped
or sexually assaulted.

This involves an understanding of the context in which rape and sexual assault occurs; the ability to assess client needs and match them to services available; and supporting the rights of clients through the implementation of practices which promote client self-determination.

Prerequisites:  None
When: 9:30am – 4:30pm TUESDAY 4th SEPTEMBER, 2018
Where: Yarrow Place, Level 2, 55 King William Road, North Adelaide
Cost: $150.00 + GST per day (WCHN Staff discount $50 + GST per day). Invoice will be sent to the person responsible for the payment

Morning tea and lunch provided

RSVP: Please email marianne.law@sa.gov.au to register. Seating is strictly limited.

Parking: Yarrow Place has no on-site parking available, there is parking at the Women’s & Children’s Hospital or Wilson’s car park on Kermode Street otherwise there is 2 hour street parking around the North Adelaide area.

This training is presented by Yarrow Place staff

Download flyer: 18.9.4 R R YP Training 4th Sept

Centacare Drug and Alcohol Service – LGBTIQ Services

Centacare, 2018

Centacare Drug and Alcohol Service LGBTIQ Services  provide alcohol and other drug counselling and in-home detox for individuals who are LGBTIQ and their identified supports.

A free service for ages 10 years and over.

The team includes an LGBTIQ Peer Worker, Counsellors, a Lived Experience Worker and a Registered Nurse.

CDAS is a safe and inclusive service for the LGBTIQ community.

Download flyer or brochure for more information:

 

A team effort: preventing violence against women through sport

Our Watch, November 2017

Sport is an integral part of Australian culture and it is woven into the fabric of the everyday lives of many Australian individuals, families and communities.

Change the story: a shared national framework for the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia identifies it as a key setting for the prevention of violence against women in Australia.

On and off the field, sport has great potential to influence social change and prevent violence against women by creating inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe environments for men and women, boys and girls.

Sport has the capacity to influence, inform and shape attitudes and behaviours in both negative and positive ways. Sporting environments are places where violence against women can occur directly and, if allowed, can provide a setting for entrenched violence-supportive attitudes and behaviours to be played out. However, this doesn’t have to be the way. Sport can be a leader to empower, motivate and inspire change, on and off the field. Sport is a powerful environment to connect boys and girls, men and women with vital information, skills and strategies to push for inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe sporting spaces for everyone.

The challenge is to extend the notion of equality and fairness into the core business of sport by addressing the drivers of violence against women and stop it before it starts.

The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment

Harvard University, 17 May 2017

This is the talk we need to have with young people. Many adults—especially parents—often fret about youth and the “hook-up culture.” But research suggests that far fewer young people are “hooking up” than we are commonly led to believe. This focus on the hook-up culture also obscures two much bigger issues that many young people appear to be struggling with: forming and maintaining healthy romantic relationships and dealing with widespread misogyny and sexual harassment. What’s more, it appears that parents and other key adults in young people’s lives often fail to address these two problems.

Making Caring Common’s new report, The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment, explores these issues and offers insights into how adults can begin to have meaningful and constructive conversations about them with the young people in their lives.

Science & Health Scabies Research Breakthrough Will Help Remote Indigenous Australian Communities

Gizmodo, 15/2/16

Australian researchers have used cutting-edge genome technologies to reveal the genetic makeup of a widespread skin parasite causing serious health problems in Aboriginal communities. The research team identified the genetic ‘map’ of the human parasitic scabies mite, accelerating research that could lead to new ways of preventing and treating scabies infestations and prevent lifelong complications for people in remote Aboriginal communities.

Read more here