HIV testing videos aimed at multicultural communities in SA

PEACE Multicultural Services, December 2016

Three new campaign videos have been made especially by and for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds.

They provide a positive spin on knowing your HIV status, whatever it may be. The theme is Get Tested, Get Treated, Live Longer.

“Testing is the key to a healthy journey, and it is important for everyone to get tested for HIV. Knowing your HIV status gives you peace of mind and the opportunity to start treatment early if needed. Testing in South Australia is easy, free, fast and confidential.

Contact PEACE Multicultural Services on 8245 8100 for further information and support.

Together we can make a positive change.”

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Correlation between pubic hair grooming and STIs

Abstract

Objective STIs are the most common infections among adults. Concurrently, pubic hair grooming is prevalent. Small-scale studies have demonstrated a relationship between pubic hair grooming and STIs. We aim to examine this relationship in a large sample of men and women.

Design We conducted a probability survey of US residents aged 18–65 years. The survey ascertained self-reported pubic hair grooming practices, sexual behaviours and STI history. We defined extreme grooming as removal of all pubic hair more than 11 times per year and high-frequency grooming as daily/weekly trimming. Cutaneous STIs included herpes, human papillomavirus, syphilis and molluscum. Secretory STIs included gonorrhoea, chlamydia and HIV. We analysed lice separately.

Results Of 7580 respondents who completed the survey, 74% reported grooming their pubic hair, 66% of men and 84% of women. After adjusting for age and lifetime sexual partners, ever having groomed was positively associated with a history of self-reported STIs (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.4 to 2.2), including cutaneous STIs (OR 2.6; CI 1.8 to 3.7), secretory STIs (OR 1.7; CI 1.3 to 2.2) and lice (OR 1.9; CI 1.3 to 2.9). These positive associations were stronger for extreme groomers (OR 4.4; CI 2.9 to 6.8) and high-frequency groomers (OR 3.5; CI 2.3 to 5.4) with cutaneous STIs, and for non-extreme groomers (OR 2.0; CI 1.3 to 3.0) and low-frequency groomers (OR 2.0; CI 1.3 to 3.1) with lice.

Conclusions Among a representative sample of US residents, pubic hair grooming was positively related to self-reported STI history. Further research is warranted to gain insight into STI risk-reduction strategies.

Access full text (open access) here 

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Women’s Preferences for Pen1s Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models

(Note; some spelling has been changed in this post to avoid automatic spam filters for email subscribers)

PLoS ONE 10(9): e0133079. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133079

Abstract

Women’s preferences for pen1s size may affect men’s comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health.

Studies of women’s pen1s size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women’s size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect pen1s sizes in different relationship contexts.

Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to pen1s length than circumference. Women preferred a pen1s of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm) versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm) sexual partners.

These first estimates of erect pen1s size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer pen1ses only slightly larger than average.

Access full text (open access) here 

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Long term decline in consistent condom use among Australian gay men

nam/adismap, 15 November 2016

Data from the last ten years of the Australian Gay Community Periodic Surveys shows a steady decline in consistent condom use, with more gay men attempting to minimise their risk by serosorting or by having an undetectable viral load.

While HIV-positive men appear to be increasingly confident in their low risk of HIV transmission, it is not clear that HIV-negative men have fully embraced the impact of antiretrovirals on HIV prevention.

Read more here 

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December GK Cooking Class for People Living with HIV

SAMESH, December 2016

Are you or your friends/family/clients living with HIV and wanting to learn to cook a Christmas meal on a budget? Come along and enjoy some great food and learn some new skills.

We understand how stressful Christmas can be when living on a budget, that’s why our December cooking demonstration will show you some budget-friendly meals that can be cooked for friends and family this Christmas.

The next class will run Wednesday 14 December, from 10am – 2pm, at 57 Hyde St. (RSVP by next Monday, 12 December, by phoning (08) 7099 5300 during business hours). The format of the day will be the same as our previous classes.

Download flyer here: gk-christmas-cooking-dec-2016

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