Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: report

Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2017

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years. Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes.

Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common. This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime. Much of what we know about sexual crime is imagined or gained through mainstream media

Most people would not be fully aware of the vast body of scientific literature regarding sexual offending. This is despite the fact that specialist knowledge is the key to effectively responding to sexual crime in the criminal justice system .

The purpose of this resource is to synthesise over 40 years of research evidence to present an accurate and updated picture of sexual offending. With specialist knowledge, we can work towards improving criminal justice responses
and outcomes in cases of sexual crime.

» This reference booklet addresses some of the most significant myths and misconceptions about adult rape and sexual offences, as well as child sexual abuse.
» The evidence has been collated from an analysis of the psychological and criminological literature.
» It provides a clear picture of what should be considered a misconception, alongside the current evidence of what is considered “typical” and “common” behaviour in both offenders and victims.
» There are multiple ways that this resource could be used. It may be useful as a guide to assist fact finders at different stages of the criminal justice process.

 

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Factsheet on the new The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017

The Equality Campaign, 18/09/2017

The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017 was introduced into parliament (and passed) at the end of last week. Included as a part of the bill was a series of temporary measures to protect people from vilification, harassment or threats of harm during the current postal survey campaign.

Also included as a part of the bill is a series of requirements in relation to campaign materials (including any form of external communication) and advertising, that are papplicable to any individual or organisation during the postal survey campaign period.

Measures and requirements that have been introduced into the bill are only applicable until the date in which the Australian Bureau of Statistics is due to announce the results of the Marriage Law Postal Survey, on 15 November 2017.

The attached fact sheet has been prepared by the Equality Campaign to assist stakeholders with activities for the upcoming campaign period. Included are the responsibilities and considerations that organisations need to review prior to distributing any material or communicating in any form that has the intent of encouraging participation in the Marriage Law Postal Survey or encouraging a vote one way or the other. The fact sheet contains essential information and new requirements that are applicable for the next eight weeks. Please note that these provisions took effect from Thursday 14 September 2017.

Same-sex marriage survey sparks spike in access of LGBTI mental health support

ABC News, 18/8/2017

A national mental health service for young people and their parents say they have experienced a spike in clients accessing LGBTI support services during the highly charged same-sex marriage postal survey period.

ReachOut CEO Jono Nicholas said there had been a 20 per cent increase in people accessing LGBTI support services with many contacting them with anxiety over the same-sex marriage survey results.

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In[ter]view: SHINE SA’s Dr Amy Moten

Verse magazine, Edition 18, September 2017

This edition we talked to Amy, SHINE SA’s Medical Educator, who is answering all your questions when it comes to the ‘what’s this’ and ‘how do I check that’ of sex.

  1. How often should people who are sexually active get tested?

You should have a test when symptoms of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) are first noticed or if a sexual partner is diagnosed with an STI or has symptoms of an STI. Even if you have no symptoms STI screening is recommended for any new sexual contact. Annual screening for people under 30 is recommended, but you can have a test every 3 months if you think you may be at higher risk.

 

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What is going on in gay men’s lives when they acquire HIV?

nam/aidsmap, Published: 08 September 2017

Gay men in England who have recently become HIV positive describe a complex web of factors which may have contributed to their infection, according to a qualitative study recently published in BMJ Open.

“Individuals who experienced multiple stressors, gradually over the life course or more suddenly, were especially vulnerable to HIV and being drawn into sexual risk situations, while the social environment created a context that enabled risk of HIV infection,” the researchers write. Individual and interpersonal factors frequently combined with community or structural factors, such as the widespread use of dating apps, chemsex and HIV treatment, as well as changing perceptions of the seriousness of an HIV infection.

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