People identifying as LGBTIQ and alcohol, tobacco & other drugs in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, last updated

Key Findings:

  • People identifying as lesbian, gay or bisexual have relatively high rates of substance use. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data available on the associated harms for this population group.
  • Almost one in 5 (18.7%) people identifying as homosexual or bisexual reported daily tobacco smoking in 2016, comapred with 12% of heterosexual people.
  • Over a quarter (25.8%) of people identifying as homosexual or bisexual reported drinking at levels exceeding lifetime risk guidelines in 2016, compared with 17.2% of heterosexual people.
  • In 2016, 42% of people identifying as homosexual or bisexual reported drinking at levels exceeding single occasion risk guidelines, compared with 26% of heterosexual people.
  • In 2016, 41.7% of people identifying as homosexual or bisexual recently used any illicit drug, compared with 14.5% of heterosexual people.

More information is available in the People identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer (LGBTIQ) fact sheet (PDF)

LGBTIQA+ Affirming Religious Communities in South Australia

Centacare, July 2020

The Centacare Rainbow Quality Team would like to provide you with a list of affirming religious communities (please see attachment via link below) that may be helpful for some people from the LGBTIQA+ community that you work with. 

Spiritual wellbeing is a human right, but unfortunately people within the Rainbow community who hold particular Christian faiths are not always awarded this human right within their own faith denominations.  In response to this need, the Centacare Rainbow Quality Team have worked on identifying religious communities within South Australia who are not just welcoming of people from the LGBTIQA+ community, but are affirming of them.

They have contacted individually the communities listed and have secured permission from them to be added to the list.  They have also identified individuals within each community that can be used as an entry point for people who wish to connect with these affirming communities.

The Team acknowledge that this is not an exhaustive list of affirming communities, and there may be others that they do not know of.  If you have additional contacts that you feel would be beneficial for this list, please let them know.  Also, if you have someone in need whom does not have a denomination listed, please let them know and they will endeavour to source a suitable community if available.  At this stage they have only identified Christian faith communities, but they do recognise that spiritual need extends well beyond this faith.  However, to date the contacts on this list is all that they have been able to identify, and they will continue to source affirming communities from other faith traditions. They can be contacted via the www.centacare.org.au/contact  website for any feedback or additional information.

Whilst the Team have gone to significant lengths to ensure the groundwork has been done to create a warm and welcoming entry into these affirming communities, they would also like to point out that they have no formal links with these communities and therefore cannot guarantee that all people will receive the support that they are looking for.  They also cannot offer support to maintain connection within these communities.

It is envisaged that this list will act as a guide for those seeking a supportive and affirming connection with a religious community that aligns with their spiritual beliefs and needs. The Centacare Rainbow Quality Team hope this list will assist you to support those with this particular need.

Pride in Prevention: A guide to primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities.

Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide

Produced by Rainbow Health Victoria for the LGBTIQ Family Violence Prevention Project 2019–202, launched 30 Jun 2020

Authors: Marina Carman, Jackson Fairchild, Matthew Parsons, Claire Farrugia, Jennifer Power and Adam Bourne.

The Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide  is now available to download.

This project forges new ground in the primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities, seeking to address critical evidence gaps, strengthen understanding of the drivers of violence, and build expertise for both LGBTIQ organisations and family violence primary prevention organisations to effectively deliver evidence-based programs.

Call for study participants: Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and its impact on LGBTQ individuals

University of Birmingham, May 2020

Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and the impact this has on the well-being of LGBTQ individuals

Image Based Sexual Abuse

This PhD study aims to explore LGBTQ individuals’ experiences of Image Based Sexual Abuse (also known as revenge pornography) on their mental health and well-being. The study is also interested in how much health and well-being organisations understand about IBSA and how easy it is for individuals to access services.

Victims of IBSA express symptoms of depression, anxiety and in some instances suicidal tendencies. This harmful impact can be felt in both the private and professional spheres for the victims. Internet users who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning or queer (LGBTQ) are far more likely than those who identify as heterosexual to have experienced threats of or actual non-consensual image-sharing. However, the majority of the current body of research focuses on heterosexual women and there is little research that is aimed at the long-term implications this can have on LGBTQ individuals in regards to their mental health and well-being. All members of the team work in the School of Nursing/ School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham. Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones is the Principal PhD Supervisor for this study and is the Programme Lead for the Risk Abuse and Violence Research Programme within the School of Nursing. Dr Nicki Ward is a lecturer in social work and is a PhD Supervisor of this study. Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers is a senior lecturer within the school of nursing and is exploring this topic as part of his PhD studies.

If you are LGBTQ and have experienced IBSA we think that you could offer a great deal in helping us with the study.

Key researchers:

  • Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones

  • Dr Nicki Ward

  • Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers

Read more or contact researchers here

 

How pregnancy can be made more difficult by maternity care’s notions of ‘normal’

The Conversation, October 8, 2019 10.04pm AEDT

Maternity records in the UK have spaces only for the expectant mother and the baby’s father. This inflexibility can cause difficulties for the pregnant person, their partner, and their unborn baby if they do not fit into these boxes.

Over the last decade there has been a significant increase in the number of people conceiving outside of the traditional model of a heterosexual couple, so this affects an increasing number of parents.

Research shows that problems occur when heteronormativity – the perception that heterosexuality is the normal, default, or preferred sexual orientation – is communicated either overtly or subtly in the way healthcare staff treat patients, the way leaflets are worded, or the assumptions made in the way administration systems are designed.

Largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of young LGBTIQ people

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, 2019

This is Me is the largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people in Australia. Conducted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, this short (8-10 minute) survey asks young people a range of questions about health and wellbeing as well as who young people go to for help and support if they need it.

This is Me is the fourth study of its kind. ARCSHS has previously conducted versions of this study in 1998, 2004 and 2010, as well as a study specifically about the health and wellbeing of transgender and gender diverse young people in 2014. These studies documented high levels of harm, and examined the impact that such stigma and discrimination had on the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ+ young people, as well as seeking to better understand who LGBTIQ+ young people turned to when in need.

The data collected from This is Me will provide important insight into the present-day lives and experiences of LGBTIQ young people. The responses young people give will help us to understand what can support LGBTIQ young people to thrive.

Evidence from the study will enable organisations, services and government to make informed decisions about how to best support the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people. Findings from the study will inform the development of LGBTIQ-inclusive mainstream, and LGBTIQ-specific, youth policies, programs and services.

 

  • Please do not promote the survey via Twitter – this platform is deliberately not part of the promotion strategy.

 

  • You can let young people know the supports available to them if filling out the survey triggers any strong feelings and they want to chat about it. If you offer counselling or support, let them know. Remind young people of support options such as Qlife, headspace or Reachout. Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 or atkidshelpline.com.au or Lifeline on 13 11 14 or at lifeline.org.au 24 hours/day 7 days per week.

 

  • Read the FAQ here FAQs