RACGP offers new suite of IUD resources

RACGP, 25th August 2020

The newly released suite consists of five intrauterine device (IUD) resources, including a checklist and patient confirmation form, patient pre- and post-insertion checklist, practitioner checklist and disclaimer. Current evidence-based options for pain relief during IUD procedures are provided as an appendix.

Dr Amy Moten, Chair of the RACGP Specific Interests Sexual Health Medicine network, led development of the resources, which she says are designed to provide guidance and support to all Australian practitioners.

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding – RACGP seminar by Dr Amy Moten

RACGP, August 2020

SHINE SA’s Sexual Health Practitioner, Dr Amy Moten will be presenting an online webinar on behalf of the RACGP on Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.  

Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presentation in general practice with heavy menstrual bleeding affecting 25% of people who are menstruating. This presentation will discuss the common causes of heavy menstrual bleeding and other menstrual irregularities and describe appropriate investigation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding.

COST: FREE (for RACGP Members)
DATE: Tuesday 11 August 2020
TIME: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm ACST

 

New sexual health videos in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab

Health Translations Directory (Victorian Government of Australia), February  2018
Health Translations Directory has now added some new audiovisual files in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab, developed by Family Planning Victoria. These are part of a series of videos about periods, pregnancy and contraception, for newly arrived migrant and refugee women in Australia.

The videos provide general information.lease speak to a health professional for appropriate individual advice.

(Note: These links may not work in all browsers – Internet explorer/Edge recommended)

 

Can diet improve the symptoms of endometriosis?

The Conversation, February 19, 2018 6.14am AEDT

By Elisabeth Gasparini, Manager of Nutrition and Food Services, The Royal Women’s Hospital

Current treatments for endometriosis, such as surgery and contraceptive pills, can be invasive or cause unpleasant side effects. So, the internet is awash with advice for alternative treatments, including acupuncture and dietary changes. Some women claim to have reduced their symptoms by eating “anti-inflammatory” foods, cutting out gluten, dairy and alcohol.

But what is the evidence behind eating or avoiding certain foods, and should women with endometriosis adhere to a specific diet?

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to ABC report on Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

SHINE SA, Issued: 13 December 2017

SHINE SA believes that decisions about contraception should be made in conjunction with a health care professional and that everyone should have access to accurate and unbiased information to enable appropriate informed contraceptive choice.

LARCs (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) including the levonorgestrel IUD1 (Mirena) and the subdermal implant (Implanon NXT) are the most effective reversible methods of contraception available. They have the additional advantage of being long lasting, convenient to use and generally well regarded by most users. LARC method failure rates rival that of tubal sterilization at <1% and unintended pregnancy rates are lower than those reported for contraceptive pill users.

Like all progestogen only contraceptive methods, LARCs may result in a change of bleeding pattern which may include no bleeding, frequent or prolonged bleeding. Users of the levonorgestrel IUD most commonly experience a reduction in bleeding over time and it is used as a treatment for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding for this reason. Only 1 in 5 users of the contraceptive implant have an increase in bleeding that persists beyond the first few months.

LARC use, and in particular the subdermal implant, is not known to be associated with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the upper part of the female reproductive system namely the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. PID is a known side effect of IUD insertion but occurs in less than 1 in 300 people. The risk of PID is only increased for the first 3 weeks after insertion, after which it returns to the previous background risk. Users of IUDs are encourage to return at any sign of infection and when treated promptly with antibiotics are unlikely to experience any long term complications.

New clinical guidelines to help with heavy menstrual bleeding

ABC Health & Wellbeing, 20/10/2017

25 percent of Australians who menstruate experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure these people have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Professor Anne Duggan, senior medical advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, said some patients were not being offered the full range of treatments.

clinical guidelines

Implementation resources

These resources can be used to promote and explain what the Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Clinical Care Standard means to health services, clinicians, patients and their carers.