‘I’m over the moon!’: patient-perceived outcomes of hepatitis C treatment

I’m over the moon!’: patient-perceived outcomes of hepatitis C treatment

Davoud Pourmarzi, Andrew Smirnov, Lisa Hall, Gerard FitzGerald, and Tony Rahman

Australian Journal of Primary Health 26(4) 319-324 https://doi.org/10.1071/PY20013

Submitted: 22 January 2020  Accepted: 29 April 2020   Published: 25 June 2020

Abstract

Understanding patient-perceived outcomes is crucial for assessing the effectiveness and acceptability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. This study aimed to explore patient-perceived outcomes of receiving direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). This study was a part of a mixed-methods case study of the Prince Charles Hospital program for improving access to HCV treatment in community settings. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with nine patients who were in different stages of their treatment for HCV. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Patients emphasised ‘having more energy’ when reporting improvements in their physical health following treatment. They also reported a newly developed sense of freedom and hope. Improved physical and mental health empowered them to start a healthy lifestyle and to practise self-protection from the risk of re-infection. Patients highlighted their desire to help other patients to receive treatment, which was connected to their experience of the services that they received and their perceived health outcomes. Patients expect and experience various outcomes that are related to the physical, psychological and social aspects of living with, and being cured of HCV. Emphasis on the short-term outcomes of receiving HCV treatment may improve HCV treatment uptake and adherence rates.

Living with HIV and want to learn how to cook nutritious meals on a budget?

SAMESH, May 2019

June is the month for SAMESH’s next free cooking class hosted by resident chef G.K.  Bring your culinary talents up to speed, and get some healthy lifestyle tips too!

Next class: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at 10 AM – 2 PM at 57 Hyde street, Adelaide, South Australia. Free of charge.

 

 

More than half of Aussie men report experiencing sexual difficulties

The Conversation, March 22, 2019

One in two Australian men aged 18 to 55 have experienced sexual difficulty in the past 12 months, according to data released this week.

The findings are drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, which included more than 12,000 men. Overall, 54% of sexually active men reported having at least one specific sexual problem lasting three months or more.

The men reported a range of difficulties.

Free cooking class for LGBTIQ+ over-50s & for PLHIV

SAMESH, April 5th 2019

SAMESH is cooking up a storm with the regular GK’s Cooking Class again!

This is an opportunity to come along and watch a professional prepare a nutritious meal on a budget (and to sample it!).

GK will also show you some of the techniques, and answer your questions – at this FREE event!

* Please note: This event is now open to for both people living with HIV, and also LGBTIQ+ people over 50yrs *

When – Wed April 17th

Time – 10am – 2pm

Where – SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide

RSVP or queries – Paul on 7099 5311 or paul.stone@samesh.org.au

Clinical Education Forum: Menopause, mood and missing mojo

SHINE SA, 15/01/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of ‘Menopause, mood and missing mojo’.

This forum is available free of charge, and will also be recorded for future access.

This forum will cover management of menopause and a discussion of perimenopausal mood disorder and sexual dysfunction.

PRESENTER: Dr Amy Moten, SHINE SA Coordinator: Medical Education.

COST: Free. Light meal will be provided.
DATES: 5 February 2019
TIME: 6pm registration, 6.30 – 8.30pm
LOCATION: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum

Enrol now via this page https://www.shinesa.org.au/events/education-forums/

 

 

 

Clinical Practice Guidelines: Pregnancy Care (2018 Edition)

Australian Government Department of Health, February 2018

Modules 1 and 2 of the Antenatal Care Guidelines have now been combined and updated to form a single set of consolidated guidelines that were renamed Pregnancy Care Guidelines and publicly released in February 2018. 

The Pregnancy Care Guidelines are designed to support Australian maternity services to provide high-quality, evidence-based antenatal care to healthy pregnant women. They are intended for all health professionals who contribute to antenatal care including midwives, obstetricians, general practitioners, practice nurses, maternal and child health nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and allied health professionals. They are implemented at national, state, territory and local levels to provide consistency of antenatal care in Australia and ensure maternity services provide high-quality, evidence-based maternity care. The Pregnancy Care Guidelines cover a wide range of topics including routine physical examinations, screening tests and social and lifestyle advice for women with an uncomplicated pregnancy.

Guidelines:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (PDF 5747 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (Word 3615 KB)

Accompanying documents:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (PDF 1979 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (Word 1330 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (PDF 1758 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (Word 1150 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (PDF 2183 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (Word 1259 KB)
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Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (PDF 1804 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (Word 1298 KB)