RACGP offers new suite of IUD resources

RACGP, 25th August 2020

The newly released suite consists of five intrauterine device (IUD) resources, including a checklist and patient confirmation form, patient pre- and post-insertion checklist, practitioner checklist and disclaimer. Current evidence-based options for pain relief during IUD procedures are provided as an appendix.

Dr Amy Moten, Chair of the RACGP Specific Interests Sexual Health Medicine network, led development of the resources, which she says are designed to provide guidance and support to all Australian practitioners.

Women taking pill may be less likely to suffer ACL injury, study finds

The Guardian,

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

Rise of contraceptive apps sparks fears over unwanted pregnancies

Guardian, 

Reproductive health of HIV-positive women being neglected, says Swiss study

nam/aidsmap, 06 February 2018

HIV-positive women in Switzerland are mainly relying on male condoms for contraception, investigators report in HIV Medicine. “Male condoms remained the most frequently used contraceptive method, whereas the use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was very uncommon,” note the researchers. “One in six women using contraceptives experienced an unwanted pregnancy, with 42% occurring while using a combined hormonal pill.

The investigators suggest that HIV clinicians need to do more to encourage effective contraceptive use by women with HIV, especially in the light of growing awareness that people with HIV with undetectable viral load do not transmit HIV. If couples stop using the male condom, women need information about which contraceptive options are suitable for them.

Withdrawing Depo-Provera contraceptives would result in more lives lost than HIV infections prevented

aidsmap / nam,  11 January 2018

Even if Depo-Provera and other contraceptive injections raise the risk of HIV infection, withdrawing them from use in African countries would greatly increase maternal mortality, a modelling study has shown. The loss of life due to pregnancy complications and unsafe abortions would far outweigh the number of HIV infections prevented, according to the study published in the December issue of Global Health: Science and Practice.