Free online event – What Is Your Vision: The Future Of Abortion Care In Australia

Children by ChoiceFamily Planning NT, I Had One Too1800 My OptionsOur Bodies Our ChoicesSouth Australian Abortion Action CoalitionSexual Health Quarters WASPHERE and Women’s Health Tasmania, September 2020

What Is Your Vision: The Future Of Abortion Care In Australia Event Banner

Event time and date: Mon 28th Sep 2020, 7:00 pm – 8:15 pm AEST (NB: this event starts at 6.30 PM Adelaide Time)

About the event

Gina Rushton will be chatting to health consumers with lived experience, abortion care providers, advocates, policymakers, and you the audience about what the future of abortion care should and could look like in Australia.

This event will be exploring the Australian abortion landscape, recognising that each State and Territory has it’s own legal, cultural and practice context.

Our panellists:

  • Chrissie Bernasconi – Health Consumer
  • Dr Sarah McEwan – Wiradjuri woman and Medical Doctor
  • Hon Dr Sharman Stone – Professor of Practice for Gender, Peace and Security, Monash University
  • Dr Mark Farrugia – Rural GP and MTOP provider
  • Professor Deb Bateson – Medical Director, Family Planning NSW
  • Dr Suzanne Belton – Medical Anthropologist and Midwife

About the facilitator

Gina Rushton is a journalist who has written for BuzzFeed News, The Guardian, The Monthly, The Saturday Paper, Crikey, PRIMER and The Australian. She is a Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists media excellence award winner and Australian Human Rights Commission media award finalist for her coverage of reproductive rights.

About International Safe Abortion Day

28th of September is International Safe Abortion Day, the herstory of this day begins in Latin America and the Caribbean where women’s groups have been mobilizing around September 28 for the last two decades to demand their governments decriminalize abortions, provide access to safe and affordable abortion services and to end stigma and discrimination towards people who choose to have abortions.

Extra info

There will be an opportunity to ask questions in a Q&A – You can also submit a question prior to the event when you register.

This event is offered in accordance with Children by Choice’s pro-choice framework. Children by Choice reserve the right to refuse registrations and remove individuals from the event.

Calls for segregated mental health wards to reduce sexual assault risk

ABC (Katherine Gregory on AM), February 2020

Sexual violence against women in mental health wards is going unchecked, despite service providers’ awareness of the problem.

A new report has found women in Victorian mental health wards are vulnerable to sexual assault, harassment and violence from male patients and staff.

It’s calling for stricter separation of male and female patients in mental health wards and an overhaul of how assault complaints are dealt with.

Broadcast: 
Duration: 3min 49sec
Featuring:

– Doctor Juliet Watson, RMIT University
– Charlotte Jones, Victorian Mental Health Legal Centre

 

 

Actions to support Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Gender Diverse, and Intersex elders

Australian Department of Health, February 2019

We know that LGBTI older people and elders are likely to have experienced violence, stigma and discrimination throughout their lives. As a result, they may be reluctant to disclose their identities or histories to aged care services and therefore remain isolated or invisible within both the aged care sector and the broader community. Combined with general stigmatisation and invisibility of LGBTI needs at large, this results in a lack of awareness of the unique needs of LGBTI elders and older people, including a lack of targeted services to support them. In addition, the fear of mistreatment or rejection from aged care providers can lead to LGBTI elders and older people delaying seeking care until their health deteriorates or a crisis occurs.

Many LGBTI elders and older people have lived through a time where identities were pathologised or criminalised, aversion therapies were encouraged, and non-consensual surgeries were routinely performed. As a result, many LGBTI older people have learned to conceal their sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status in order to be safe, particularly when interacting with the health or social services sector. The fear and mistrust of these services in the past have led LGBTI elders and older people to be reluctant to utilise mainstream services, including aged care. Reliving past discrimination when encountering new forms of discrimination in the aged care
environment can lead to feelings of anxiety and/or depression.

The Action Plan is a resource that will assist aged care service providers to better understand how they can advocate for and support LGBTI elders and older people. By providing culturally safe and inclusive services, providers will build confidence amongst LGBTI elders and older people and their carers, families of choice (who may or may not include biological family) and allies that aged care services are available for them and they will be given the support and care they need as they age.

The Consumer Guide captures the voice of LGBTI peoples expressed through those consultations. It is intended both to help LGBTI peoples express their needs when speaking with aged care providers and as a resource to support people working in aged care to understand the perspectives of LGBTI peoples.

Advertising (in)equality: the impacts of sexist advertising on women’s health and wellbeing

Women’s Health Victoria, Issues Paper No. 14, December 2018

 

The aim of this issues paper is to provide an overview of significant literature

currently published on the nature of gender portrayals in advertising, and the

impacts of these representations on women’s health and wellbeing, gender

inequality and attitudes and behaviours that support violence against women.

 

This issues paper found that the continued use of gender stereotypes

and increasing reliance on images that sexualise and objectify women in

advertisements undermines efforts to promote gender equality in Australia.

Gender-stereotyped portrayals limit the aspirations, expectations, interests and

participation of women and men in our society. These portrayals are associated

with a range of negative health and wellbeing outcomes and are highly

problematic for the prevention of family violence and other forms of violence

against women.

 

The studies cited in this paper demonstrate that there is a clear business

case for change. Brands, businesses and creative agencies can benefit from

portraying both women and men proportionately, respectfully and realistically.