Pride in Prevention: A guide to primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities.

Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide

Produced by Rainbow Health Victoria for the LGBTIQ Family Violence Prevention Project 2019–202, launched 30 Jun 2020

Authors: Marina Carman, Jackson Fairchild, Matthew Parsons, Claire Farrugia, Jennifer Power and Adam Bourne.

The Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide  is now available to download.

This project forges new ground in the primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities, seeking to address critical evidence gaps, strengthen understanding of the drivers of violence, and build expertise for both LGBTIQ organisations and family violence primary prevention organisations to effectively deliver evidence-based programs.

Call for study participants: Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and its impact on LGBTQ individuals

University of Birmingham, May 2020

Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and the impact this has on the well-being of LGBTQ individuals

Image Based Sexual Abuse

This PhD study aims to explore LGBTQ individuals’ experiences of Image Based Sexual Abuse (also known as revenge pornography) on their mental health and well-being. The study is also interested in how much health and well-being organisations understand about IBSA and how easy it is for individuals to access services.

Victims of IBSA express symptoms of depression, anxiety and in some instances suicidal tendencies. This harmful impact can be felt in both the private and professional spheres for the victims. Internet users who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning or queer (LGBTQ) are far more likely than those who identify as heterosexual to have experienced threats of or actual non-consensual image-sharing. However, the majority of the current body of research focuses on heterosexual women and there is little research that is aimed at the long-term implications this can have on LGBTQ individuals in regards to their mental health and well-being. All members of the team work in the School of Nursing/ School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham. Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones is the Principal PhD Supervisor for this study and is the Programme Lead for the Risk Abuse and Violence Research Programme within the School of Nursing. Dr Nicki Ward is a lecturer in social work and is a PhD Supervisor of this study. Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers is a senior lecturer within the school of nursing and is exploring this topic as part of his PhD studies.

If you are LGBTQ and have experienced IBSA we think that you could offer a great deal in helping us with the study.

Key researchers:

  • Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones

  • Dr Nicki Ward

  • Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers

Read more or contact researchers here

 

Developing LGBTQ programs for perpetrators and victims/survivors of domestic and family violence

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, 2020

Developed under the guidance of a project reference group comprised of key academics, clinicians and researchers in the areas of LGBTQ theory and practice, domestic and family violence interventions and social work practice, this research highlights the need to support the LGBTQ community in developing readiness to recognise domestic and family violence, and then seek support.

Identifying and responding to LGBTQ DFV/IPV can present specific challenges.

Key findings:
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can be difficult to identify and understand due to the “heterosexual face” of domestic violence.
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can involve unique tactics of abuse, including identity-based abuse.
  • Trauma from discrimination and stigma (minority stress) impact experiences of DFV/IPV for LGBTQ community members, but are not directly causal.
  • LGBTQ community readiness to recognise DFV/IPV and seek support, as well as service responses to LGBTQ people experiencing DFV/IPV, must be strengthened.

 

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IDAHOBIT 2020: South Australian community event (free)

South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance and South Australian Department of Human Services, April 2020

17 May is IDAHOBIT – the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexphobia and Transphobia. IDAHOBIT’s theme for 2020 is “Breaking the Silence”, and that’s precisely what we’re going to do!

Although we might not be able to meet together in person to recognise this important date due to COVID-19, the South Australian Department of Human Services and the South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance have joined together to host a special online event for the South Australian LGBTIQ+ community via Zoom.

Join us on Sunday 17 May for a Q&A session featuring LGBTIQ+ people from several diverse backgrounds as we discuss what “Breaking the Silence” means for our rainbow communities.

The Q&A session will feature:

  • Zac Cannell, TransMasc SA & transgender community leader
  • Sarah K Reece, LGBTIQ+ disability advocate
  • Neha MadhokDemocracy in Colour

We are also delighted to welcome Michelle Lensink MLC, Minister for Human Services, to speak with us at the event, as well as Jason Tuazon-McCheyne (founder of The Equality Project) to tell us about the Better Together LGBTIQ+ conference that is coming to Adelaide in 2021.

SARAA acknowledges the Kaurna people as the traditional custodians of the Adelaide Plains. We also acknowledge other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their continued connection to their lands throughout Australia.

FAQs

How can I submit a question for the Q&A session?

Questions can be submitted via Zoom during the event, or you can submit a question in advance by emailing chairsaraa@gmail.com

How do I join the webinar?

After registering on Eventbrite, you will receive an email with instructions on how to join the Zoom webinar. Simply follow the link provided and you’ll be able to join on 17 May.

Do I need to be part of the LGBTIQ+ community to attend?

Not at all! Allies are welcome to join us and learn more from our amazing speakers!

Network MindOut webinar: The Impact of Bisexual+ Invisibility on Mental Health

National LGBTI Health Alliance, Recorded 24th March 2020

Bisexual+ people are thought to be the largest group in the LGBTIQ+ population, yet are commonly misunderstood by mainstream society and often invisible in the broader LGBTIQ+ discourse. Although many bisexuals are comfortable with, if not proud of their identity, research from around the world tells us that bisexual+ people are more vulnerable to systemic and individual victimisation than lesbians and gays, and mental health outcomes are particularly poor as a result. This webinar will explore the impacts of bisexual+ invisibility on mental health, and will offer practical tips on how to be more inclusive.

Presenter: Misty Farquhar is a PhD Researcher at the Curtin University Centre for Human Rights Education, where they also teach. Misty’s research explores how people living outside binary ideas of sexuality / gender experience recognition in Australia. Misty is extremely active in community outreach, education, and advocacy efforts and is the founder of Bisexual+ Community Perth.

Largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of young LGBTIQ people

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, 2019

This is Me is the largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people in Australia. Conducted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, this short (8-10 minute) survey asks young people a range of questions about health and wellbeing as well as who young people go to for help and support if they need it.

This is Me is the fourth study of its kind. ARCSHS has previously conducted versions of this study in 1998, 2004 and 2010, as well as a study specifically about the health and wellbeing of transgender and gender diverse young people in 2014. These studies documented high levels of harm, and examined the impact that such stigma and discrimination had on the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ+ young people, as well as seeking to better understand who LGBTIQ+ young people turned to when in need.

The data collected from This is Me will provide important insight into the present-day lives and experiences of LGBTIQ young people. The responses young people give will help us to understand what can support LGBTIQ young people to thrive.

Evidence from the study will enable organisations, services and government to make informed decisions about how to best support the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people. Findings from the study will inform the development of LGBTIQ-inclusive mainstream, and LGBTIQ-specific, youth policies, programs and services.

 

  • Please do not promote the survey via Twitter – this platform is deliberately not part of the promotion strategy.

 

  • You can let young people know the supports available to them if filling out the survey triggers any strong feelings and they want to chat about it. If you offer counselling or support, let them know. Remind young people of support options such as Qlife, headspace or Reachout. Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 or atkidshelpline.com.au or Lifeline on 13 11 14 or at lifeline.org.au 24 hours/day 7 days per week.

 

  • Read the FAQ here FAQs