New Resource for young LGBTIQA+ people

Victim Support Service, May 2020

The Rainbow Safety Guide is an informational wallet card that links LGBTIQ+ youth experiencing violence and abuse to online and phone resources. The Guide was made by and for LGBTIQ+ youth.


meet the artist/DESIGNER: India Potter (she/they is an Adelaide based young queer artist who does both digital and watercolour designs. Her art often portrays the queer community and aspects of LGBTIQ+ life. Both an artist and graphic designer, India created the art and designed the wallet card, taking special care to create art that was representative, colourful, but discreet enough that without the first page the Rainbow Safety Guide is less obviously a LGBTIQ+ resource.


This wallet sized Guide can be easily carried around by its user. It provides links to support services & information that may help them by:
• phone numbers
• online links
• QR codes

Due to the card’s small size it can be shared discreetly so as to not unintentionally “out” the recipient. If you are not in a position to physically give the card to someone, you can share this online link or our other LGBTIQ+ pages. The quick exit feature allows the reader to hide the page quickly if needed.

This wallet card will be valuable to services who work with youth, as well as individuals who know a young LGBTIQ+ person who they know or suspect is experiencing violence or abuse.

  • Read more at the VSS website here
  • To view or download the Rainbow Safety Guide card (PDF), click here
  • To request a physical copy email the VSS helpdesk at helpdesk@victimsa.org

 

A sex-positive approach in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights programming for youth

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), February 2020

IPPF have created the new resource pack: A sex-positive approach in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights programming for youth.

Please start with opening the toolkit which provides additional guidelines on how to use the resources. The toolkit is interlinked with the videos and the presentation hence going through the manual will navigate you through all materials available.

 

Australia’s Gen Z Study

Australia’s Gen Zs: negotiating religion, sexuality & diversity

ANU, Deakin and Monash Universities, 2019.

Contemporary teenagers (Gen Z) are exposed to diversity in ways that are unprecedented, through social media, school and peers. How do they experience and understand religious, spiritual, gender and sexual diversity?

How are their experiences mediated by where they go to school, their faith and their geographic location? Are they materialist, secular, religious, spiritual, or do they have hybrid identities? How religiously literate are they? How is this shaping their worldviews?

The Australian Gen Z study provides a powerful insight into how teenagers are making sense of the world around them. This Australian Research Council funded project creates new ways of understanding the complexity of young people’s lives and the ways they are apprehending and dealing with diversity. We argue school education about worldviews is founded on ways of thinking about young people that do not reflect the complexities of Gen Z’s everyday experiences of diversity and their interactions with each other.

In October 2019 the first project report was released as part of the AGZ Study.

Policy Consultation Forum: LGBTIQ and youth community feedback sought

SHINE SA, August 2018

LGBTIQ and youth community feedback is sought on SA Health Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive & Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN) Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities and young people (under 30) are invited to an information session to learn about the draft Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive for SA Health as well as the draft SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. SA Health and SALHN, in partnership with SHINE SA, are facilitating an information and feedback session about these important documents. We look forward to hearing your views on the policy and model of care.

The SA Health Policy aims to provide a comprehensive overarching framework which consolidates equity and access requirements for South Australia’s diverse health consumers consistent with the South Australian Government Universal Access and Inclusion Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Policy is intended to provide strategic direction to SA Health employees, or persons who provide health care services on behalf of SA Health, to ensure that access to public health services is equitable for all South Australian health consumers.

The central purpose of the SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care is to provide high level guidance pertaining to the provision of safe and high quality care to Southern Adelaide Local Health Networks diverse mental health consumers. The core principles speak to the provision of person centred, evidence based recovery oriented care that is provided by an appropriately diverse multi-disciplinary team. Strong emphasis has been placed upon care delivery within the context of a culturally and linguistically safe service that engenders strong collaborative partnerships across agencies and between consumers, carers and health professionals. A Service Plan is being developed to operationalise the Model of Care, and both elements will be implemented in parallel once development is complete.

Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

At SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000

Free event

Light refreshments will be provided

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, hat and textmodel of care

Teen sexting: pleasure is missing from the discussion

Sexting has increased among teens in recent years, and increases as youths age, according to new research published in JAMA Pediatrics.

An estimated one in seven teens sends sexts and one in four receives them, according to the research.

The paper reviews 39 studies conducted between 1990 to 2016 involving more than 110,000 participants. Two studies took place in Australia, and others in countries including the United States, Korea and South Africa.

Summary of results: Trans Pathways: the mental health experiences and care pathways of trans young people

Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, September 1, 2017

Trans Pathways is the largest study ever conducted of the mental health and care pathways of trans and gender diverse young people in Australia (859 participants). It is also the first Australian study to incorporate the views of parents and guardians of trans young people (194 participants).

What did Trans Pathways tell us?

  • Trans young people are at very high risk for poor mental health, self-harming and suicide attempts
  • Trans young people found it difficult to access health services
  • Many trans young people have experienced negative situations that affect their mental health such as peer rejection, bullying, issues with school, university or TAFE, and a lack of family support
  • Participants told us they used music and art, peers and friends, activism, social media and pets to make themselves feel better and take care of their mental wellbeing

The authors have provided a list of recommendations for governments and health providers, as well as guidance for schools, parents, peers and young trans people.

Download report:

If you or anyone you know needs help: