Young Australians’ use of pornography and associations with sexual risk behaviours

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 2017, 41: 438–443. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12678

Abstract

Objectives: Amid public health concern that rising pornography use may have a negative impact on young people’s health and wellbeing, we report prevalence of pornography viewing and explore factors associated with viewing frequency and age at first viewing.

Methods: Cross-sectional online survey in a convenience sample of Victorians aged 15 to 29 years recruited via social media.

Results: Ever viewing pornography was reported by 815 of 941 (87%) participants. The median age at first pornography viewing was 13 years for men and 16 years for women. More frequent pornography viewing was associated with male gender, younger age, higher education, non-heterosexual identity, ever having anal intercourse and recent mental health problems. Younger age at first pornography viewing was associated with male gender, younger current age, higher education, non-heterosexual identity, younger age at first sexual contact and recent mental health problems.

Conclusions: Pornography use is common and associated with some health and behavioural outcomes. Longitudinal research is needed to determine the causal impact of pornography on these factors.

Implications for public health: Viewing pornography is common and frequent among young people from a young age and this needs to be considered in sexuality education.

The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment

Harvard University, 17 May 2017

This is the talk we need to have with young people. Many adults—especially parents—often fret about youth and the “hook-up culture.” But research suggests that far fewer young people are “hooking up” than we are commonly led to believe. This focus on the hook-up culture also obscures two much bigger issues that many young people appear to be struggling with: forming and maintaining healthy romantic relationships and dealing with widespread misogyny and sexual harassment. What’s more, it appears that parents and other key adults in young people’s lives often fail to address these two problems.

Making Caring Common’s new report, The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment, explores these issues and offers insights into how adults can begin to have meaningful and constructive conversations about them with the young people in their lives.

The FRESH Course: SHine SA’s Sexual Health Course for Youth & Community Workers

SHINE SA, posted 7/4/17

The FRESH Course: SHINE SA’s Sexual Health Course for Youth & Community Workers is a dynamic 3-day course which aims to update workers to include relationships and sexual health education and support them in their work.

On completion of the FRESH Course you will have:

> an increased level of confidence working with clients in the area of sexual health

> a better understanding of how values and beliefs may influence your practice in this area of work

> a new vocabulary about sexual health and relationships to use when talking with your clients

> practical skills to address clients’ sexual health needs through assessment, program development, delivery and evaluation

> become familiar with current resources available and how to use them effectively with clients to explore the many areas of sexuality and sexual health

A further optional module, FRESH Assessment, relates to planning, delivering and evaluating a multi-session education program in the workplace.

When 10, 11 & 12 May 2017 (Wed, Thurs, Fri)

Where SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time 9am – 5pm

Cost $399 Student Concession: $199. Early Bird Concession: 10%  off if registered 2 months ahead

Topics include:

  • Introduction to Sexual Health
  • Attitudes to Sex & Sexuality
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Contraception
  • Pregnancy Options
  • Safer Sex & STIs
  • Gender & Diversity
  • Sexual Violence
  • Pleasure
  • Resources
  • Interactions between mental health and sexual health

Further Information & online enrolment:

www.shinesa.org.au/courses/youth-and-other-community-services-workers

Enquiries:

Phone 8300 5324 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer: FRESH Youth May 2017

New digital resource on revenge po*rn & cyberbullying in SA

The Law Society, 2 November 2016

The Law Society and University of Adelaide have launched a new digital cyberbullying resource which deals with new revenge porn laws that came into force in SA on Friday.

A cyberbullying section has been added to the app Out of Bounds (previously called The Naked Truth), which also explains the laws surrounding unlawful sexual intercourse and sexting.

The new cyberbullying section provides a snapshot of South Australian and Federal laws that can apply to a range of cyberbullying activities, including revenge porn, trolling, and stalking. It also features a graphic novel style narrative about a school student who has been subject to cyber abuse, and the devastating ramifications for both the victim and the perpetrators involved.

The cyberbullying section is a natural extension of the app, said Law Society President David Caruso.

“As well as adding an extensive cyberbullying section, we’ve updated the sexting section of the app to reflect new laws which criminalise revenge porn,” Mr Caruso said.

“Sexting can quickly turn from digital flirting to bullying. Cyberbullying in all its forms is a particularly insidious and devastating form of victimisation. It is impossible to escape, it emboldens more people to demean others under the veil of anonymity, and the vitriol and humiliation can spread far wider and quicker than traditional ‘schoolyard’ bullying.”

“The South Australian Government ought to be commended for acknowledging this and strengthening laws against revenge porn. In saying this, we still see scope for further law reform that reduces the risk of teenagers facing child pornography charges for naïve but innocent behaviour, while maintaining a zero tolerance approach to sexual predators.

“Of course, laws can only do so much – the key is education.”

University of Adelaide law lecturer Dr Colette Langos, who collaborated with the Law Society on the app, said: “Many young people regard sexting as a common behaviour, so it is especially important to make sure they understand where ‘a bit of fun between friends’ crosses the line and becomes unlawful conduct.”

“Evidence-based research informs us that non-consensual behaviour in the form of cyberbullying or ‘revenge porn’ has the potential to harm a victim in a profound manner given the public humiliation which follows distribution of the image online. Law reform in this area may better protect victims.”

Dr Langos said the new law enables police to charge a person under the age of 17 years with a non-indictable offence of ‘distribution of an invasive image’ rather than charging a young person under the child pornography legislation. The new laws also make it an offence to threaten to distribute an invasive image.

“There is a big distinction between abhorrent, predatory conduct and conduct which frequently, and sometimes regrettably, occurs between young people without predatory intent,” Dr Langos said.

Mr Caruso said: “This app is not designed to scare young people into changing their behaviour. It aims to explain the law in a digestible and interactive way to help young people make informed decisions. Many teenagers, and older people for that matter, are not aware of the legal boundaries regarding sexual behaviour and online communication.”

– Download the Out of Bounds app on your Apple Device
– Download the Out of Bounds app on your Android device
– Visit the Out of Bounds webpage

Source

Forum: Porn literacy: raising sexually intelligent young people

SHine SA, October 2016

In the words of Dr Marty Klein, Licensed Sex Therapist, Writer and Speaker: “In addition to death and taxes, there are two other things we can be sure of:  The internet is here to stay. Pornography is here to stay.”

With that in mind, join us at our ReFRESH Forum as we discuss the need to equip our young people with the essential skills and strategies to critique, understand and de-code what they see (be it accidental or purposeful viewing).

The session includes discussion time and practical tips.

When: 11 November 2016 (Friday)
Where: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time: 2.00 – 4.00 pm
Cost: $50 (Student Concession $25)
Afternoon tea provided.

REGISTRATION:
Online enrolment: www.shinesa.org.au/events/refresh-forums
Closing date for enrolment: Wednesday 9 November
Enquiries Phone 8300 5300 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer (PDF) here:refresh-porn-literacy

Casual Sex: Everyone Is Doing It

New Yorker,

Zhana Vrangalova has spent the past decade researching human sexuality, and, in particular, the kinds of sexual encounters that occur outside the norms of committed relationships. The Web site she started in 2014 began as a small endeavor fuelled by personal referrals, but has since grown to approximately five thousand visitors a day, most of whom arrive at the site through organic Internet searches or referrals through articles and social media. Vrangalova was offered an appointment at N.Y.U., where she remains, to further explore some of the issues surrounding the effects of nontraditional sexual behaviors on the individuals who engage in them.

  • Read more here
  • Access the Casual Sex Project here