More Support for Young People with Complex Mental Health Needs

Adelaide phn, February 7 2019

Adelaide PHN and Sonder have opened the doors to emerge – a new, free service in Adelaide’s outer northern and outer southern metropolitan regions, specifically created to help people from 16-25 years old who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing severe and complex mental illness.

The program aims to help young people who might otherwise “fall through the cracks”.

Commissioned and funded by Adelaide PHN as part of a suite of mental health services across the metropolitan region, emerge has a specific focus on young people dealing with anxiety, depression, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, psychosis, trauma and borderline personality disorder, where these conditions are having a significant impact on their lives.

Emerge will provide these young people with access to client and family-centred treatment that is specialised, clinical and evidence-based.

Within the new program, the young person, their family, clinicians, peer workers, care coordinators etc. will work as a team towards the goal of wellness and recovery.

Emerge will operate from Sonder-run headspace centres – Edinburgh North and Onkaparinga – with services commencing on 11 February 2019.

Referrals can be received from GPs and other primary health care providers. Alternatively, young people can self-refer or be referred through a school or community worker. Families, carers or friends can also refer on behalf of the young person, however these referrals must take place with the person’s consent.

Adelaide PHN has also provided funding for additional youth mental health services at headspace Adelaide and Port Adelaide, and will announce further mental health services for Aboriginal youth in the coming months.

For further information about emerge, please contact Sonder on (08) 8209 0700 or visit the website www.sonder.net.au.

For more information about Adelaide PHN visit  adelaidephn.com.au.

New evidence supports HIV screening in young adulthood

Science Daily, December 19, 2017

A new study suggests that the most beneficial age for a one-time screening HIV test of the general population would be age 25.

The report — led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital  working with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health — will be published in the Journal of Adolescent Health and has been issued online.

Resource Kit – Young People and Sexual Health

NSW STI Programs Unit, 2017

The Resource Kit contians tools, fact sheets, activities and protocols for working with young people around sexual health.

Tools supporting organisations to engage in sexual health

Sexual health tools and fact sheets for workers

Fun games to start the sexual health conversations

New periodic survey on sexual health among young heterosexual people

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, 2017

Between December 2015 and March 2016, the ‘It’s Your Love Life’ periodic survey recruited 2,120 heterosexually-identified young people aged 15–29 years and living in New South Wales (NSW). The data collected through the survey contributes new knowledge on the attitudes and practices of heterosexual young people and their exposure to sexual health promotion initiatives.

Results indicate that substantial effort is required to support heterosexual young people in ensuring their sexual health.

Contents include:

  • Knowledge of sexually transmissible infections (STIs)
  • Perceived severity of STIs
  • Perceived risk of contracting an STI
  • Condom use-related views
  • Carrying condoms while being on a date
  • Sexual intercourse with and without condoms
  • Contraception
  • STI testing-related views
  • Testing for STIs and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Exposure to messages promoting condom use and testing for STIs
  • Familiarity and engagement with sexual health promotion resources, activities and services
  • Sexual health education in secondary schools

IYLL is an online cross-sectional survey that will be repeated annually. A first round of data collection was completed between December 2015 and March 2016

Consent flowchart – education tool

Planned Parenthood Toronto, [2015?]

The consent flowchart has been designed to help young people understand how consent is negotiated.

People follow the instructional bubbles until they reach the end. They can continue each time they choose a consent option. If they choose an option where consent is not given, they land on an orange bubble and must go back to the beginning and start over. 

Yellow bubbles show different possible reposes to lack of consent.

Consent is not just about sex, as this chart shows.

Queering Sex Ed (QSE), which created this resource, is a project at Planned Parenthood Toronto, developing sex ed resources with and for LGBTQ youth. They create resources which are:

 

  • Inclusive
  • Accessible
  • Sex-positive
  • Includes trans* and cis people
  • Asexual positive
  • Doesn’t assume identity
  • Youth positive
  • Body positive
  • Empowering, not fear/shame based
  • Opens rather than closes possibilities
  • Accounts for pleasure
  • Awesome

Download the consent flowchart (PDF) here 

Same-sex marriage survey sparks spike in access of LGBTI mental health support

ABC News, 18/8/2017

A national mental health service for young people and their parents say they have experienced a spike in clients accessing LGBTI support services during the highly charged same-sex marriage postal survey period.

ReachOut CEO Jono Nicholas said there had been a 20 per cent increase in people accessing LGBTI support services with many contacting them with anxiety over the same-sex marriage survey results.