Advertising (in)equality: the impacts of sexist advertising on women’s health and wellbeing

Women’s Health Victoria, Issues Paper No. 14, December 2018

 

The aim of this issues paper is to provide an overview of significant literature

currently published on the nature of gender portrayals in advertising, and the

impacts of these representations on women’s health and wellbeing, gender

inequality and attitudes and behaviours that support violence against women.

 

This issues paper found that the continued use of gender stereotypes

and increasing reliance on images that sexualise and objectify women in

advertisements undermines efforts to promote gender equality in Australia.

Gender-stereotyped portrayals limit the aspirations, expectations, interests and

participation of women and men in our society. These portrayals are associated

with a range of negative health and wellbeing outcomes and are highly

problematic for the prevention of family violence and other forms of violence

against women.

 

The studies cited in this paper demonstrate that there is a clear business

case for change. Brands, businesses and creative agencies can benefit from

portraying both women and men proportionately, respectfully and realistically.

 

Launching the Australian Trans and Gender Diverse Sexual Health Survey

 Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney, November 5 2018

Virtually nothing is known about the sexual lives of trans and gender diverse people living in Australia. A new survey coordinated by the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney in collaboration with community advocates from across Australia will provide the first national data on topics related to sex and romance among Australia’s trans and gender diverse communities.

“This trans-led research is the first of its kind in Australia and we need as many people from our community as possible to do the survey and to encourage their trans and gender diverse mates to do it too,” said Teddy Cook from the Peer Advocacy Network for the Sexual Health of Trans Masculinities (‘PASH.tm’) and one of the study’s chief investigators.reserese

The online survey covers a diverse range of topics including online and offline dating, sexual health care, pleasure and satisfaction and marriage. The data from the survey will be used to inform service delivery, guide public policy, and otherwise support the sexual well-being of trans and gender diverse people.

As another of the study’s chief investigators, Liz Duck-Chong, explained: “sexual health isn’t just about testing, it has to be about talking. We have designed this survey to take a big-picture look at the experiences and desires of people who are often assumed to not have them at all.”

Although international research suggests that trans and gender diverse people have sexual lives and experiences that are unique from their cisgender peers, very little research has looked at this in detail in Australia or overseas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Translation and implementation of the Australian-led PCOS guideline

Translation and implementation of the Australian-led PCOS guideline: clinical summary and translation resources from the International Evidence-based Guideline for the Assessment and Management of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Med J Aust 2018; 209 (7 Suppl): S3-S8. || doi: 10.5694/mja18.00656
Published online: 2018-10-01

Abstract

Introduction: We have developed the first international evidence-based guideline for the diagnosis and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with an integrated translation program incorporating resources for health professionals and consumers. The development process involved an extensive Australian-led international and multidisciplinary collaboration of health professionals and consumers over 2 years. The guideline is approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council and aims to support both health professionals and women with PCOS in improving care, health outcomes and quality of life. A robust evaluation process will diagnoenable practice benchmarking and feedback to further inform evidence-based practice. We propose that this methodology could be used in developing and implementing guidelines for other women’s health conditions and beyond.

Main recommendations: The recommendations cover the following broad areas: diagnosis, screening and risk assessment depending on life stage; emotional wellbeing; healthy lifestyle; pharmacological treatment for non-fertility indications; and assessment and treatment of infertility.

Changes in management as a result of this guideline: •Diagnosis:▪when the combination of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction is present, ultrasound examination of the ovaries is not necessary for diagnosis of PCOS in adult women;▪requires the combination of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction in young women within 8 years of menarche, with ultrasound examination of the ovaries not recommended, owing to the overlap with normal ovarian physiology; and▪adolescents with some clinical features of PCOS, but without a clear diagnosis, should be regarded as “at risk” and receive follow-up assessment.•Screening for metabolic complications has been refined and incorporates both PCOS status and additional metabolic risk factors.•Treatment of infertility: letrozole is now first line treatment for infertility as it improves live birth rates while reducing multiple metapregnancies compared with clomiphene citrate.

New clinic posters for download from Young Deadly Free

Young Deadly Free, October 2018

The team at Young Deadly Free have been busy creating new posters with Aboriginal communities across Australia. The posters aim to get their key messages out to young people and others in a fresh, engaging way.

All of our posters highlight positive messages from people living and working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities about the importance of STI and BBV testing.

  • View and download their 36 new posters here

Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status, 2017

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet, Last updated: 15 June 2018

The Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status  aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The initial sections of the Overview provide information about the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, population, and various measures of population health status. The remaining sections are about selected health conditions and risk and protective factors that contribute to the overall health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These sections comprise an introduction and evidence of the extent of the condition or risk/protective factor.

The annual Overview is a resource relevant for workers, students and others who need to access up-to-date information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Accompanying the Overview is a set of PowerPoint slides designed to help lecturers and others provide up-to-date information.