Results of the Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey 2016

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health, August 2016

In 2016, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health conducted the second annual Women’s Health Survey to understand the health information needs and behaviours of women living in Australia.

The survey set out to explore the health information needs of women and also identify trends in health behaviours, body image, mental health and health screening behaviours.
The 2016 Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey was a national survey of 3236 women and health professionals of differing ages, cultural backgrounds and from a range of metropolitan, regional, rural and remote locations across Australia.
A selection of the key findings are outlined below:
Health concerns and information needs
• Women reported five main health concerns. These health concerns included weight
management, female-specific cancers, mental and emotional health, menopause and chronic pain.
• Nearly half of all women reported that they wanted more information on healthy eating and nutrition. Women also reported they wanted more information on mental health, weight management and memory.
• Women residing in metropolitan locations reported different health information needs to
women in regional and rural Australia.
Health checks and screening
• On average women visited the doctor 3-5 times per year, with only a small number of women not visiting the doctor at all in the last 12 months.
• Most women felt confident to ask their doctor questions and discuss health issues that were of concern. Only a small group reported that they were not confident to ask questions.
• Health professionals reported family violence, followed by painful sex and sexual health problems as health topics that their female patients found difficult to discuss.
• Most women reported engaging in general health checks as well as pap screening, breast screening and bowel screening. However, many women reported that they were not engaging in sexual health screening for STIs.
Download report (PDF) here

One in five women giving birth in Australia are 35 or over, data shows

Guardian Australia, Monday 14 December 2015

More than one in five women giving birth in Australia are now aged 35 or over, the latest official figures show.

The latest birth data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows the proportion of mothers aged 35 and older who gave birth increased by four percentage points to 22% in the decade to 2013.

Women who gave birth aged under 24 decreased from 19% to 17%; 30.1 years was the average age in 2013, up from 29.5 years a decade earlier. First-time mothers had an average age of 28.6 years.

Read more here

Obese teens in study less likely to use contraception

Medical Xpress, July 1, 2015

A study of nearly 1,000 teens found that sexually active obese adolescents were significantly less likely to use contraception than normal weight peers, putting them at higher risk of unintended pregnancy. Obese adolescents who did use contraception were also less likely to use it consistently, according to the University of Michigan Health System study that appears in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Read more here

New Australian Report Reveals Lesbian Health Gaps

ACON, 18 March 2015

A world leading study shows that lesbian, bisexual and queer women experience a range of poor health outcomes including high rates of mental health issues, and rates of smoking and risky alcohol use much higher than those of women in the general population.
  • Read more here
  • Download SWASH Report  2014 here